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The Mysore Declaration

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Peter Lepping
Affiliation:
(Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board) and Honorary Professor (Bangor University) Centre for Mental Health and Society, Wrexham Academic Unit, Technology Park, Wrexham, Wales, UK, email peter.lepping@wales.nhs.uk
B. N. Raveesh
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Mysore Medical College and Research Institute, Mysore, India
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Coercion is recognised as a problem in health services around the world. Very little is known about the use and utility of coercive measures in psychiatry and other medical specialties in India, although the existing evidence supports the view that coercion is widely used. In February 2013 experts from India and Europe came together in Mysore, India, for an international symposium on coercion. A Declaration was drafted, discussed and ratified which defines coercive measures for the Indian context and which outlines ways to minimise coercion in medical settings in India. This paper describes the main points of the Declaration.

Type
Special Papers
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists 2013

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