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Eating disorders in the elderly

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2010

Maria I. Lapid*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, U.S.A.
Maria C. Prom
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, U.S.A.
M. Caroline Burton
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, U.S.A.
Donald E. McAlpine
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, U.S.A.
Bruce Sutor
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, U.S.A.
Teresa A. Rummans
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, U.S.A.
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Maria I. Lapid, MD, Mayo Clinic Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, U.S.A. Phone: +1 507-255-7184; Fax: +1 507-255-7365. Email: lapid.maria@mayo.edu.

Abstract

Background: Eating disorders in the elderly are often overlooked. When they occur, significant morbidity and mortality result. In this study we review all existing literature on eating disorders in the elderly and provide practical guidelines for clinicians in recognizing and managing eating disorders in the elderly.

Methods: A literature search using Medline(R), PubMed(R), Web of Knowledge(R), and PsychINFO(R) revealed 48 published cases of eating disorders in people over the age of 50 years.

Results: The mean age was 68.6 years (range 50–94), and the majority (88%) of cases were females. The majority (81%) of cases had anorexia nervosa, and 10% had bulimia nervosa. Late onset eating disorders were more common (69%) than early onset. Comorbid psychiatric conditions existed in 60%, most commonly major depression. Management with a combination of behavioral and pharmacologic interventions was most successful, although only 42% were treated successfully. Mortality was high (21%) secondary to the eating disorder and its complications.

Conclusion: Eating disorders do occur in the elderly and should be included in the differential diagnosis of unexplained weight loss in the elderly.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2010

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