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A process evaluation of a Psychomotor Dance Therapy Intervention (DANCIN) for behavior change in dementia: attitudes and beliefs of participating residents and staff

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2016

Azucena Guzmán*
Affiliation:
Clinical Psychology Department, School of Health in Social Science, The University of Edinburgh, Old Medical Quad, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Lisa Robinson
Affiliation:
Falls and Syncope Service, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK Faculty of Medical Sciences Graduate School, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
Lynn Rochester
Affiliation:
Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Institute for Ageing, Clinical Ageing Research Unit, Campus for Ageing & Vitality, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, UK
Ian A. James
Affiliation:
Campus for Ageing & Vitality, Centre of the Health of the Elderly, NTW, NHS FT, (Formerly Newcastle General Hospital), Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, UK
Julian C. Hughes
Affiliation:
University of Bristol, The RICE Centre, Royal United Hospital, Combe Park, Bath, England, UK
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Azucena Guzmán, Clinical Psychologist, Lecturer in Health & Ageing, Clinical Psychology Department, School of Health in Social Science, The University of Edinburgh, Old Medical Quad, Doorway 6, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, UK. Phone: +44 (0) 131 651 5162. Email: Azucena.Guzman@ed.ac.uk.

Abstract

Background:

In a previous paper, we presented results from a 12-week study of a Psychomotor DANCe Therapy INtervention (DANCIN) based on Danzón Latin Ballroom that involves motor, emotional-affective, and cognitive domains, using a multiple-baseline single-case design in three care homes. This paper reports the results of a complementary process evaluation to elicit the attitudes and beliefs of home care staff, participating residents, and family members with the aim of refining the content of DANCIN in dementia care.

Methods:

An external researcher collected bespoke questionnaires from ten participating residents, 32 care home staff, and three participants’ family members who provided impromptu feedback in one of the care homes. The Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy v1 (BCTTv1) provided a methodological tool for identifying active components of the DANCIN approach warranting further exploration, development, and implementation.

Results:

Ten residents found DANCIN beneficial in terms of mood and socialization in the care home. Overall, 78% of the staff thought DANCIN led to improvements in residents’ mood; 75% agreed that there were improvements in behavior; 56% reported increased job satisfaction; 78% of staff were enthusiastic about receiving further training. Based on participants’ responses, four BCTTv1 labels–Social support (emotional), Focus on past success and verbal persuasion to boost self-efficacy, Restructuring the social environment and Habit formation–were identified to describe the intervention. Residents and staff recommended including additional musical genres and extending the session length. Discussions of implementing a supervision system to sustain DANCIN regularly regardless of management or staff turnover were suggested.

Conclusions:

Care home residents with mild to moderate dementia wanted to continue DANCIN as part of their routine care and staff and family members were largely supportive of this approach. This study argues in favor of further dissemination of DANCIN in care homes. We provide recommendations for the future development of DANCIN based on the views of key stakeholder groups.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2016 

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