Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-kwsbc Total loading time: 0.275 Render date: 2022-10-06T05:05:21.077Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Similarities in the Disturbances in Cortical Information Processing in Alcoholism and Aging: A Pilot Evoked Potential Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2005

Nashaat N. Boutros
Affiliation:
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Veterans Adminisration-Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut, USA
M. Carrington Reid
Affiliation:
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Veterans Adminisration-Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut, USA
Ismene Petrakis
Affiliation:
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Veterans Adminisration-Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut, USA
Duane Campbell
Affiliation:
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Veterans Adminisration-Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut, USA
Michael Torello
Affiliation:
Capital University, Columbus, Ohio, USA.
John Krystal
Affiliation:
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Veterans Adminisration-Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut, USA

Abstract

Objective: To examine the hypothesis that chronic alcohol use causes accelerated aging of the brain. Methods: The auditory evoked potentials (EPs) were compared in three groups of 10 subjects each: (a) middle-aged individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria for alcohol dependence, (b) age- and gender-matched group of healthy individuals, and (c) an older (>65 years) group of gender-matched healthy individuals. Multiple levels of cortical information processing were examined using EPs. Early stages of information processing, related to sensory gating and stimulus classification (P50, N100/P200), were studied using a paired-click paradigm. Later stages of information processing associated with memory upgrading and identification of novel stimuli (P300) were studied using an oddball paradigm. Results: The amplitude and latency of the P300 of the alcoholic patients and the older healthy subjects differed significantly from those of the younger healthy group. Both groups showed changes that have been reported in association with aging. A tendency towards decreased sensory gating in later stages of information processing was noted in the aged healthy individuals. Conclusions: These data suggest that alcohol dependence may accelerate the aging process. The tendency towards a sensory gating deficit during the attentive phase of information processing in older healthy subjects requires further investigation because it may be a marker for an increased proneness to developing psychotic symptoms in that group.

Type
Articles
Copyright
© 2000 International Psychogeriatric Association

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
21
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Similarities in the Disturbances in Cortical Information Processing in Alcoholism and Aging: A Pilot Evoked Potential Study
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Similarities in the Disturbances in Cortical Information Processing in Alcoholism and Aging: A Pilot Evoked Potential Study
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Similarities in the Disturbances in Cortical Information Processing in Alcoholism and Aging: A Pilot Evoked Potential Study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *