Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-pclkk Total loading time: 0.396 Render date: 2021-05-12T16:47:59.568Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

A study of the effectiveness of MP3 players to support family carers of people living with dementia at home

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 September 2014

Virginia Lewis
Affiliation:
Centre for Health Systems Development, La Trobe University, Melbourne Campus, Victoria, Australia
Michael Bauer
Affiliation:
Australian Centre for Evidence Based Aged Care, La Trobe University, Melbourne Campus, Victoria, Australia
Margaret Winbolt
Affiliation:
Australian Centre for Evidence Based Aged Care, La Trobe University, Melbourne Campus, Victoria, Australia
Carol Chenco
Affiliation:
Australian Centre for Evidence Based Aged Care, La Trobe University, Melbourne Campus, Victoria, Australia
Francine Hanley
Affiliation:
Centre for Health Systems Development, La Trobe University, Melbourne Campus, Victoria, Australia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background:

Music can be therapeutic to people with dementia; however, little is known about its effect on the family carers. This project aimed to (1) assess the effects of MP3 player use by a person with dementia on caregivers’ mental health and wellbeing, including their self-care and health-promoting behavior and (2) determine whether MP3 player use increases caregivers’ self-reported capacity to cope with their role.

Methods:

A pre–post quantitative and qualitative design was used. Carers completed a survey prior to commencing and four weeks after using the player. The survey included validated measures to assess the level of stress and coping among carers. Carers also kept a diary of the way they used the MP3 player. Half of the carers were interviewed about their experiences at the end of the study.

Results:

Of 59 people who started using the MP3 player, 51 carers completed the four-week study period and surveys. Use of the MP3 player significantly decreased psychological distress, significantly improved the mental health and wellbeing of carers, significantly increased caregiver self-efficacy to manage symptoms of dementia, and was reported to provide valued respite from the high level of vigilance required for caring for a person with dementia.

Conclusion:

An MP3 player loaded with music can be a low cost and relatively simple and effective additional strategy to support families caring for people with dementia in the community.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2014 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Ambrey, C. L. and Fleming, C. M. (2012). The Lucky Country? Life Satisfaction in Australia 2001. Griffith University.Google Scholar
Argimon, J. M., Limon, E., Vila, J. and Cabezas, C. (2004). Health-related quality of life in carers of patients with dementia. Family Practice, 21, 454457.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Australian Bureau of Statistics (2012). Information Paper: Use of the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale in ABS Health Surveys, Australia, 2007–08. Available at: http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4817.0.55.001Chapter92007-08.Google Scholar
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2012). Dementia in Australia. Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.Google ScholarPubMed
Brodaty, H., Thomson, C., Thompson, C. and Fine, M. (2005). Why caregivers of people with dementia and memory loss don't use services. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 20, 537546.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carr, A., Kimberley, H. and Mercieca, M. (2013). Caring for Carers: Evaluation of a Support Program for Carers of People with Dementia [Online]. Melbourne, Australia: Brotherhood of St. Laurence. Available at: http://www.bsl.org.au/pdfs/CarrKimberleyMercieca_Caring_for_carers_evaluation_2012.pdf#page=1; Accessed March 2013.Google Scholar
Clarke, E. F. (2007). The impact of recording on listening. Twentieth-Century Music, 4, 4770.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cohen-Mansfield, J., Marx, M. S. and Rosenthal, A. S. (1989). A description of agitation a nursing home. Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, 44, 7784.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Croog, S. H., Burleson, J. A., Sudilovsky, A. and Baume, R. M. (2006). Spouse caregivers of Alzheimer patients: problem responses to caregiver burden. Aging and Mental Health, 10, 87100.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cuddy, L. L. and Duffin, J. (2005). Music, memory, and Alzheimer's disease: is music recognition spared in dementia, and how can it be assessed? Medical Hypotheses, 64, 229235.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Department of Health (2009). Living well with Dementia: A National Dementia Strategy, Department of Health. UK.Google ScholarPubMed
Department of Health (2012), Victorian Population Health Survey 2010, State Government of Victoria, Melbourne.Google Scholar
Etters, L., Goodall, D. and Harrison, B. E. (2008). Caregiver burden among dementia patient caregivers: a review of the literature. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 20, 423428.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Family Caregiver Alliance (2011). Fact Sheet: Selected Caregiver Statistics [Online]. Available at: http://www.caregiver.org/caregiver/jsp/content_node.jsp?nodeid=439; last accessed March 2013.Google Scholar
Fortinsky, R. H., Kercher, K. and Burant, C. J. (2002). Measurement and correlates of family caregiver self-efficacy for managing dementia. Aging and Mental Health, 6, 153160.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gallagher-Thompson, D. et al. (2012). International perspectives on nonpharmacological best practices for dementia family caregivers: a review. Clinical Gerontologist, 35, 316355.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gerdner, L. (2005). Use of individualized music by trained staff and family. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 31, 2230.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Goldberg, D. P. et al. (1997). The validity of two versions of the GHQ in the WHO study of mental illness in general health care. Psychological Medicine, 27, 191197.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hulme, C., Wright, J., Crocker, T., Oluboyede, Y. and House, A. (2010). Non-pharmacological approaches for dementia that informal carers might try or access: a systematic review. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 25, 756763.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Janata, P. (2012). Effects of widespread and frequent personalized music programming on agitation and depression in assisted living facility residents with Alzheimer-Type dementia. Music and Medicine, 4, 815.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kessler, R. C. et al. (2002). Short screening scales to monitor population prevalences and trends in non-specific psychological distress. Psychological Medicine, 32, 959976.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Knapp, M. et al. (2007). Dementia UK–A Report into the Prevalence and Cost of Dementia [Online]. London: Alzheimer's Society. Available at: http://alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/download_info.php?fileID=2; last accessed March 2013.Google Scholar
Lee, P. E., Gill, S. S. and Rochon, P. (2006). Atypical antipsychotics to treat the neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 2, 521529.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lewis, V., Gardner, L. and Parslow, R. (2010). Evaluation of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Mental Health Initiative 2007–2010. Report prepared for Department of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA). Available at: http://www.dva.gov.au/health_and_wellbeing/research/Documents/DVA_Mental_Health_2006BM_Evaluation.pdf.Google Scholar
Nolan, M., Bauer, M. and Nay, R. (2009). Supporting family carers: implementing a relational and dynamic approach. In Nay, R. and Garratt, S. (eds.), Older People: Issues and Innovations in Care. 3rd edn, Sydney: Elsevier.Google Scholar
Nygård, L. and Starkhammer, S. (2007). The use of everyday technology by people with dementia living alone: mapping out the difficulties. Aging and Mental Health, 11, 144155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pearlin, L., Mullan, J., Semple, S. and Skaff, M. (1990). Care-giving and the stress process: an overview of concepts and their measures. The Gerontologist, 30, 583594.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pickard, S. (1999). Co-ordinated care for older people with dementia. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 13, 345354.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rapoport, M., Mamdani, M., Shulman, K. I., Herrmann, N. and Rochon, P. A. (2005). Antipsychotic use in the elderly: shifting trends and increasing costs. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 20, 749753.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schneider, L. S. et al. (2006). Effectiveness of atypical antipsychotic drugs in patients with Alzheimer's disease. New England Journal of Medicine, 355, 15251538.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Szinovacz, M. E. and Davey, A. (2004). Honeymoons and joint lunches: effects of retirement and spouse's employment on depressive symptoms. Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences. 59B, 233245.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sixsmith, A. and Gibson, G. (2007). Music and the wellbeing of people with dementia. Ageing and Society, 27, 127145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stirling, C., Andrews, S., Croft, T., Vickers, J., Turner, P. and Robinson, A. (2010). Measuring dementia carers’ unmet need for services - an exploratory mixed method study. BMC Health Services Research, 10, 122.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sung, H. C. and Chang, A. M. (2005). Use of preferred music to decrease agiated behaviours in older people with dementia. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 14, 11331140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sung, H.C., Chang, A. M. and Abbey, J. (2006). The effects of preferred music on agitation of older people with dementia in Taiwan. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 21, 9991000.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Trappe, H. J. (2012). The effect of music on human physiology and pathophysiology. Music and Medicine, 4, 100105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vinick, B. H. and Ekerdt, D. J. (1991). Retirement: what happens to husband–wife relationships? Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 24, 2340.Google Scholar
Wall, M. and Duffy, A. (2010). The effects of music therapy for older people with dementia. British Journal of Nursing, 19, 108113.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wooden, M and Watson, N. (2007). The HILDA Survey and its contribution to economic and social research. Economic Record, 83, 208231.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
World Health Organisation (2004). Palliative Care for Older People. In Davies, E. and Higginson, I. J. (eds.), Denmark: WHO Regional Office for Europe.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A study of the effectiveness of MP3 players to support family carers of people living with dementia at home
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

A study of the effectiveness of MP3 players to support family carers of people living with dementia at home
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

A study of the effectiveness of MP3 players to support family carers of people living with dementia at home
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *