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    Reid, Colin W. 2016. Citizens of Nowhere: longing, belonging and exile among Irish Protestant writers in Britain,c.1830–1970. Irish Studies Review, Vol. 24, Issue. 3, p. 255.


    Harris, Alana 2015. Astonishing scenes at the Scottish Lourdes: masculinity, the miraculous, and sectarian strife at Carfin, 1922–1945. The Innes Review, Vol. 66, Issue. 1, p. 102.


    MacPherson, D. A. J. 2014. Personal Narratives of Family and Ethnic Identity: Orangewomen in Scotland and England,c.1940–2010. Immigrants & Minorities, Vol. 32, Issue. 1, p. 90.


    Kaufmann, Eric 2006. The Dynamics of Orangeism in Scotland. Social Science History, Vol. 30, Issue. 02, p. 263.


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  • International Review of Social History, Volume 37, Issue 2
  • August 1992, pp. 177-206

The Orange Order in Scotland Between the Wars

Abstract
Summary

This paper focuses on the theme of religious conflict within the working class in inter-war Scotland. It pays particular attention to the Protestant working class of the industrial lowlands and to the role of the exclusively Protestant secret society of Irish origin, the Orange Order. It attempts to explain why the inter-war period saw an upsurge in membership of sectarian organisations like the Orange Order and their activities; and at the same time was notable for a broadening of Labour Party support among the working class which transcended religious divisions. It argues that sectarian and class loyalties often went together and in some ways reinforced each other. The Orange Order leadership's Conservative politics is stressed but it is contended that the Order's appeal to the working class was to a large extent based on issues such as education and mixed marriages and perceived Irish Catholic immigration, issues which did not break down neatly into party political terms. It is argued that the Orange Order's social role was of great significance in this period of economic austerity and mass unemployment.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Bradley, “Change and Continuity in History and Sociology: the case of Industrial Paternalism”, in S. Kendrick , P. Straw and D. McCrone (eds), Interpreting the Past, Understanding the Present (London, 1990), pp. 177195.

F.W.S. Craig , British Parliamentary Election Results, 1918–1949 (London, 1977).

K. Burgess , “Clydeside and the Division of Labour c. 1860–1930”, Social History, 11 (051986), no. 2, pp. 211233 regarding the issue of the control of supervisors.

A.C. Hepburn , “The Belfast Riots of 1935”, Social History, 15 (011990), pp. 7596.

W. Knox , “Religion and the Scottish Labour Movement”, Journal of Contemporary History, 23 (1988), pp. 609630.

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International Review of Social History
  • ISSN: 0020-8590
  • EISSN: 1469-512X
  • URL: /core/journals/international-review-of-social-history
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