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Balancing Act: Competition and Cooperation in US Asia-Pacific Regionalism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2011

J. D. KENNETH BOUTIN*
Affiliation:
Deakin University, Geelongken.boutin@deakin.edu.au

Abstract

While the United States is an important Asia-Pacific actor, its engagement with the region is complex and often difficult. Not only must US regionalism balance the diverse requirements of an ambitious policy agenda, but also US policy norms and priorities often clash with those of other regional actors. This has important implications for the capacity of the United States to provide regional leadership. Recent years have seen growing policy convergence between the United States and other Asia-Pacific actors, particularly in economic terms, but US regionalism continues to feature competition alongside collaboration.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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