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Simultaneous Media Experience and Synesthesia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 October 2005

JOSEPH J. PILOTTA
Affiliation:
Ohio State University, joe@bigresearch.com
DON SCHULTZ
Affiliation:
Northwestern University, Agora Inc., dschultz@northwestern.edu
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Abstract

The findings demonstrate that simultaneous media usage is a fact, undermining typical media measurements done in isolated environments that neglect the everyday patterns of media users. More importantly, the simultaneous media experience points to the concept of synesthesia as an experiential integrator of differing sensory fields. The experience of simultaneous media foreground/background relationship needs to be incorporated into the media planning and allocation mix if we are to actually address the consumers' media experience with multitasking.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Copyright © 1960-2005, The ARF

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References

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