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The Impact of the Oil Sector on Commodity Prices: Correlation or Causation?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 January 2015

Sayed H. Saghaian
Affiliation:
University of Kentucky, Department of Agricultural Economics, Lexington, KY
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Abstract

The interconnections of agriculture and energy markets have increased through the rise in the new biofuel agribusinesses and the oil-ethanol-corn linkages. The question is whether these linkages have a causal structure by which oil prices affect commodity prices and through these links, instability is transferred from energy markets to already volatile agricultural markets. In this article, we present empirical results using contemporary time-series analysis and Granger causality supplemented by a directed graph theory modeling approach to identify the links and plausible contemporaneous causal structures among energy and commodity variables. The results show that although there is a strong correlation among oil and commodity prices, the evidence for a causal link from oil to commodity prices is mixed.

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Invited Paper Sessions
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Agricultural Economics Association 2010

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