Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-rq46b Total loading time: 0.25 Render date: 2022-12-05T11:14:29.056Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae of winter and spring cereals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

J. G. Buwalda
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Herts., AL5 2JQ
D. P. Stribley
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Herts., AL5 2JQ
P. B. Tinker
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Herts., AL5 2JQ

Summary

The importance of mycorrhizal infection for the growth of wheat and barley sown in winter and spring was assessed in two field experiments. Low temperatures during winter restricted the development of mycorrhizal infection, and calculations of ‘thermal time’ indicated that the percentage of root length infected did not increase when mean temperatures were less than 5 °C. Hence infection was less in the winter-sown crops than in the spring-sown crops at early stages of plant development. However, the effects of mycorrhizal infection on growth were greater in winter-sown than in spring-sown wheat.

At all levels of applied phosphorus up to 60 kg P/ha, artificial inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi increased the yields of both cereals at each sowing date by 17–25% after indigenous mycorrhizal fungi had been removed by fumigation, but the effects were smaller on non-fumigated plots. The results confirmed the potential importance of mycorrhizal infection for the growth of cereals.

Mycorrhizal infection increased the phosphorus concentration in the plant tissue at very early stages of growth, but the effect generally declined with time.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

Baker, C. K., Gallagher, J. N. & Monteith, J. L. (1980). Daylength change and leaf appearance in winter wheat. Plant Cell and Environment 3, 285287.Google Scholar
Barraclough, P. B. & Leigh, R. A. (1984). The growth and activity of winter wheat roots in the field: the effect of sowing date and soil type on root growth of high-yielding crops. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 103, 5974.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Black, R. L. B. & Tinker, P. B. (1979). The development of endomycorrhizal root systems. II. Effect of agronomic factors and soil conditions on the development of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection in barley and on the endophyte spore density. New Phytologist 83, 401413.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buwalda, J. G., Stribley, D. P. & Tinker, P. B. (1985). Effects of vesieular-arbuseular mycorrhizal infection in first, second and third cereal crops. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 105, 631647.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clarke, C. & Mosse, B. (1981). Plant growth responses to vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza. XII. Field inoculation responses of barley at two soil P levels. New Phytologist 87, 695703.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cooper, K. M. & Tinker, P. B. (1981). Translocation and transfer of nutrients in vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas. IV. Effects of environmental variables on movement of phosphorus. New Phytologist 81, 4352.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Daft, M. J., Chilvers, M. T. & Nicolson, T. H. (1980). Mycorrhizas of the Liliflorae. I. Morphogenesis of Endymion non-scriptus (L.) Garcke and its mycorrhizas in nature. New Phytologist 85, 181189.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fogg, D. N. & Wilkinson, N. I. (1958). The colorimetric determination of phosphorus. Analyst, London 83, 406414.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furlan, V. & Fortin, J. A. (1973). Formation of endomycorrhizae by Endogone calospora on Allium cepa under three temperature regimes. Naturaliste Canadien 100, 467477.Google Scholar
Gallagher, J. N. (1976). The growth of cereals in relation to weather. Ph.D. thesis, University of Nottingham School of Agriculture.Google Scholar
Gregory, P. J., Crawford, D. V. & McGowan, M. (1979). Nutrient relations in winter wheat. I. Growth of the root system. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 93, 495504.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hay, R. K. M. & Tunnicliffe-Wilson, G. (1982). Leaf appearance and extension in field-grown winter wheat plants: the importance of soil temperature during vegetative growth. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 99, 403410.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hayman, D. S. (1974). Plant growth responses to vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza. IV. Effect of light and temperature. New Phytologist 73, 7180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jakobsen, I. & Nielsen, N. E. (1983). Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza in field grown crops. Mycorrhizal infection in cereals and peas at various times and soil depths. New Phytologist 93, 401413.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Owusu-Bennoah, E. & Mosse, B. (1979). Plant growth responses to vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza. XI. Field inoculation responses in barley, lucerne and onion. New Phytologist 83, 671679.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Phillips, J. M. & Hayman, D. S. (1970). Improved procedures for clearing roots and staining parasitic and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for rapid assessment of infection. Transactions of the British Mycological Society 55, 158161.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Powell, C. Ll. (1981). Inoculation of barley with efficient mycorrhizal fungi stimulates seed yield. Plant and Soil 59, 487491.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schenck, N. C. & Schroeder, V. N. (1974). Temperature response of Endogone mycorrhiza on soybean roots. Mycologia 66, 600605.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schenck, N. C. & Smith, G. (1982). Response of six species of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and their effects on soybean at four soil temperatures. New Phytologist 92, 193201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, S. E. & Bowen, G. D. (1979). Soil temperature, mycorrhizal infection and nodulation of Medicago truncalula and Trifolium sublerraneum. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 11, 469473.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sutcliffe, J. (1977). Plants and Temperature. London: Edward Arnold.Google Scholar
Weir, A. H., Bragg, P. L., Porter, J. R. & Bayner, J. H. (1984). A winter wheat crop simulation model without water or nutrient limitations. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 102, 371382.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae of winter and spring cereals
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae of winter and spring cereals
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae of winter and spring cereals
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *