Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-gblv7 Total loading time: 0.423 Render date: 2022-05-28T20:50:44.490Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Hatoko Comes Home: Civil Society and Nuclear Power in Japan

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 September 2011

Abstract

This article seeks to explain how, given Japan's “nuclear allergy” following World War II, a small coastal town not far from Hiroshima volunteered to host a nuclear power plant in the early 1980s. Where standard explanations of contentious nuclear power siting decisions have focused on the regional power utilities and the central government, this paper instead examines the importance of historical change and civil society at a local level. Using a microhistorical approach based on interviews and archival materials, and framing our discussion with a popular Japanese television show known as Hatoko's Sea, we illustrate the agency of municipal actors in the decision-making process. In this way, we highlight the significance of long-term economic transformations, demographic decline, and vertical social networks in local invitations to controversial facilities. These perspectives are particularly important in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima crisis, as the outside world seeks to understand how and why Japan embraced atomic energy.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Association for Asian Studies, Inc. 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Aldrich, Daniel P. 2005. “The Limits of Flexible and Adaptive Institutions: The Japanese Government's Role in Nuclear Power Plant Siting over the Post War Period.” In Managing Conflict in Facility Siting, edited by Hayden Lesbirel, S. and Shaw, Daigee, 111136. UK: Edward Elgar Publishers.Google Scholar
Aldrich, Daniel P.. 2008. Site Fights: Divisive Facilities and Civil Society in Japan and the West. Ithaca NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Asahi Shinbun. 2001. Kokusaku no yukue: Kaminoseki genpatsu keikaku no nijū nen [The Direction of National Policy: twenty years of the Kaminoseki nuclear power station plan]. Kagoshima: Nanpō shinsha.Google Scholar
Broadbent, Jeffrey. 1998. Environmental Politics in Japan: Networks of Power and Protest. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, Richard D. 2003. “Microhistory and the Post-Modern Challenge.” Journal of the Early Republic 23 (1): 120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chūgoku Denryoku Kabushiki Gaisha. 2001. Chūgoku Denryoku 50-nenshi: anata to tomoni, chikyū to tomoni [A 50-year History of Chūgoku Electric: together with you, together with the earth]. Hiroshima: Chūgoku Denryoku Kabushiki Gaisha.Google Scholar
Chūgoku Shinbun [Chūgoku Newspaper]. (Various years).Google Scholar
Dingman, Roger. 1990. “Alliance in Crisis: The Lucky Dragon Incident and Japanese-American Relations.” In The Great Powers in East Asia, 1953–1960, edited by Cohen, Warren I. and Iriye, Akira, 187214. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Donnelly, Michael W. 1993. “Japan's Nuclear Energy Quest.” Japan's Foreign Policy After the Cold War: Coping with Change, edited by Curtis, Gerald L.. Armonk, New York: M.E. Sharpe.Google Scholar
Dower, John W. 1993. “‘NI’ and ‘F’: Japan's wartime atomic bomb research.” In Japan in War and Peace: Selected Essays, edited by Dower, John. New York: New Press.Google Scholar
Dusinberre, Martin. 2012. Hard Times in the Hometown: A History of Community Survival in Modern Japan. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dusinberre, Martin. 2008. “Unread relics of a transnational ‘hometown’ in rural western Japan.” Japan Forum 20 (3): 305335.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
The Federation of Electric Power Companies of Japan. 2004. Electricity Review Japan, 2003–2004. Tokyo: FEPC.Google Scholar
Garon, Sheldon. 1997. Molding Japanese Minds: The State in Everyday Life. New Jersey: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Goldman, Alan. 1994. Doing Business with the Japanese: A Guide to Successful Communication, Management, and Diplomacy. Albany: State University of New York.Google Scholar
Gunn, Geoffrey. 2008. “Southeast Asia's Looming Nuclear Power Industry.” Japan Focus, accessed through http://japanfocus.org/-Geoffrey-Gunn/2659, last accessed 9 October 2010.Google Scholar
Haddad, Mary Alice. 2010. “From Undemocratic to Democratic Civil Society: Japan's Volunteer Fire Departments.” The Journal of Asian Studies 69 (1): 3356.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hamilton, James. 1993. “Politics and Social Costs: Estimating the Impact of Collective Action on Hazardous Waste Facilities.” RAND Journal of Economics 24 (1): 101125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harvey, Paul A.S. 1998. “Nonchan's Dream: NHK morning serialized television novels.” In The Worlds of Japanese Popular Culture: Gender, Shifting Boundaries and Global Cultures, edited by Martinez, D.P., 133151. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Hayashi, Hidehiko. 1974–75. Hatoko. Tokyo: Nihon Hōsō Kyōkai. 3 vols.Google Scholar
Homei, Aya. “Treatment for Radiation Sickness and the US-Japan Medical Cooperation after the Lucky Dragon Incident.” Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences. (forthcoming).Google Scholar
Ivy, Marilyn. 1995. Discourses of the Vanishing: Modernity, Phantasm, Japan. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, Chalmers. 1982. MITI and the Japanese Miracle: The Growth of Industrial Policy, 1925–1975. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Kaminoseki Chōshi Hensan Iinkai. 1988. Kaminoseki chōshi [Kaminoseki Town History]. Kaminoseki: Kaminoseki-chō yakuba.Google Scholar
Kaminoseki Kōhō [Kaminoseki News]. (Various years).Google Scholar
Lesbirel, S. Hayden. 1998. NIMBY Politics in Japan: Energy Siting and the Management of Environmental Conflict. Ithaca NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Low, Morris, Nakayama, Shigeru, and Yoshioka, Hitoshia. 1999. Science, Technology and Society in Contemporary Japan. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Morris-Suzuki, Tessa. 1998. Re-inventing Japan: Time, Space, Nation. London and New York: M.E. Sharpe.Google Scholar
Nakasone, Yasuhiro. 1996. Tenchi Yūjō: gojū-nen no sengo seiji wo kataru (Tenchi Yūjō: narrating fifty years of post-war politics). Tokyo: Bungei shunjū.Google Scholar
Nakasone, Yasuhiro. Japan: A State Strategy for the Twenty-first Century. Translated by Connors, Lesley, Hood, Christopher, and Nishikawa, Toshiyuki. New York and London: Routledge. 2002.Google Scholar
Nihon Genshiryoku Sangyō Kaigi [Japan Atomic Industrial Forum]. (Various Years). Industry Notes. Tokyo: Nihon Genshiryoku Sangyō Kaigi.Google Scholar
Nishikawa, Shunsaku. 1978. Productivity, Subsistence, and By-Employment in the Mid-Nineteenth Century Chōshū. Explorations in Economic History 15: 6983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oe, Kenzaburō. Hiroshima Notes. Translated by Swain, David and Yonezawa, Toshi. New York: Grove Press. 1995.Google Scholar
Pekkanen, Robert. 2006. Japan's Dual Civil Society: Members Without Advocates. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Pharr, Susan. 1990. Losing Face: Status Politics in Japan. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Pierson, Paul. 2004. Politics in Time: History, Institutions, and Social Analysis. Princeton: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Samuels, Richard. 1987. The Business of the Japanese State: Energy Markets in Comparative and Historical Perspective. Ithaca NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Schwartz, Frank J. and Pharr, Susan J. 2003. The State of Civil Society in Japan. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sherman, Daniel. 2006. “Not Here, Not There, Not Anywhere: The Federal, State and Local Politics of Low-level Radioactive Waste Disposal in the United States, 1979–1999.” Paper Presented at the 2006 Northeastern Political Science Association Conference: Boston, Massachusetts. (9–11 November, 2006). (Sherman, 2006)Google Scholar
Smith, Thomas C. 1969. Farm Family By-Employments in Preindustrial Japan. Journal of Economic History 29 (4): 687715.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tabusa, Keiko. 1992. “Nuclear Politics: Exploring the Nexus between Citizens' Movements and Public Policy in Japan.” PhD. diss. Columbia University. (Tabusa 1992).Google Scholar
Taketani, Mitsuo. 1976. Genshiryoku hatsuden [Nuclear Power Generation]. Tokyo: Iwanami shoten.Google Scholar
Wigen, Kären. 1995. The Making of a Japanese Periphery, 1750–1920. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Yamaguchi-Ken, Sōmubu Tōkeika. 1957. Murotsu Kaminoseki chiku jūmin seikatsu jittai [The Living Conditions of Residents in the districts of Murotsu and Kaminoseki]. Yamaguchi: Yamaguchi-ken sōmubu tōkeika.Google Scholar
Yomiuri Shinbun [Yomiuri Newspaper]. (Various years).Google Scholar
Yoshioka, Hitoshia. 1999. Genshiryoku no shakaishi [A Social History of Nuclear Power]. Tokyo: Asahi Shinbunsha.Google Scholar
Zonabend, Francoise. The Nuclear Peninsula. Translated by Underwood, J.A.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1993 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
27
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Hatoko Comes Home: Civil Society and Nuclear Power in Japan
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Hatoko Comes Home: Civil Society and Nuclear Power in Japan
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Hatoko Comes Home: Civil Society and Nuclear Power in Japan
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *