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    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Manithip, C. Sihavong, A. Edin, K. Wahlstrom, R. and Wessel, H. 2011. Factors Associated with Antenatal Care Utilization Among Rural Women in Lao People’s Democratic Republic. Maternal and Child Health Journal, Vol. 15, Issue. 8, p. 1356.


    Ay, Pinar Hayran, Osman Topuzoglu, Ahmet Hidiroglu, Seyhan Coskun, Anahit Save, Dilsad Nalbant, Hacer Ozdemir, Erhan and Eker, Levent 2009. The influence of gender roles on health seeking behaviour during pregnancy in Turkey. The European Journal of Contraception & Reproductive Health Care, Vol. 14, Issue. 4, p. 290.


    Koc, Ismet Hancioglu, Attila and Cavlin, Alanur 2008. Demographic Differentials and Demographic Integration of Turkish and Kurdish Populations in Turkey. Population Research and Policy Review, Vol. 27, Issue. 4, p. 447.


    Bilenko, Natalya Hammel, Rachel and Belmaker, Ilana 2007. Utilization of Antenatal Care Services by a Semi-Nomadic Bedouin Arab Population: Evaluation of the Impact of a Local Maternal and Child Health Clinic. Maternal and Child Health Journal, Vol. 11, Issue. 5, p. 425.


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VARIABLES THAT EXPLAIN VARIATION IN PRENATAL CARE IN TURKEY; SOCIAL CLASS, EDUCATION AND ETHNICITY RE-VISITED

  • DILEK CINDOGLU (a1) and IBRAHIM SIRKECI (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021932001002619
  • Published online: 01 April 2001
Abstract

The extent and quality of prenatal care are important for the health of women and their babies. Recent studies suggest that women lack adequate prenatal care in contemporary Turkey. This paper uses regression models to examine the major factors impacting on the access of women to prenatal care through the 1993 Turkish Demographic and Health Survey. The findings suggest that after controlling for class, ethnicity does not explain the likelihood of a woman’s access to prenatal care, partly because the predominant patriarchal ideology in Turkey determines women’s access to education, which in turn determines their access to prenatal care. It can be argued that unless women’s socioeconomic status in the family improves, their access to health care in general and prenatal care in particular will not increase significantly.

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Journal of Biosocial Science
  • ISSN: 0021-9320
  • EISSN: 1469-7599
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-biosocial-science
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