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429. Studies on Egyptian Domiati cheese

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

A. H. Fahmi
Affiliation:
Dairying Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Fouad El-Awal University, Giza, Egypt
H. A. Sharara
Affiliation:
Dairying Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Fouad El-Awal University, Giza, Egypt

Extract

In the first part of this study, brief notes are given on the better known varieties of the soft pickled group of cheese which the authors believe to be best suited to warm climatic conditions.

Domiati cheese, a variety of this group, characterized by the addition of an appreciable amount of salt to the milk prior to rennetting, is described in detail. An outline of the steps of its manufacture, the pickling process, and the effect of the amount of salt added to the milk on the composition of the resulting cheese is given.

In the second part the effects of varying additions of salt to both cows' and buffaloes' milk on rennet coagulation, rate of whey drainage, chemical composition and yield of cheese and whey were investigated.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1950

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References

REFERENCES

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