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Proteomic study of proteolysis during ripening of Cheddar cheese made from milk over a lactation cycle

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 February 2012

Katharina Hinz
Affiliation:
School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
Paula M O'Connor
Affiliation:
Teagasc Food Research Centre, Moorepark, Fermoy, Ireland
Bernadette O'Brien
Affiliation:
Animal and Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Teagasc, Moorepark, Fermoy, Ireland
Thom Huppertz
Affiliation:
NIZO food research, Ede, The Netherlands
R Paul Ross
Affiliation:
Teagasc Food Research Centre, Moorepark, Fermoy, Ireland
Alan L Kelly*
Affiliation:
School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
*
*For correspondence; e-mail: a.kelly@ucc.ie

Abstract

Milk for cheese production in Ireland is predominantly produced by pasture-fed spring-calving herds. Consequently, there are marked seasonal changes in milk composition, which arise from the interactive lactational, dietary and environmental factors. In this study, Cheddar cheese was manufactured on a laboratory scale from milk taken from a spring calving herd, over a 9-month lactation cycle between early April and early December. Plasmin activity of 6-months-old Cheddar cheese samples generally decreased over ripening time. One-dimensional urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of cheese samples taken after 6 months of ripening showed an extensive hydrolysis of caseins, with the fastest hydrolysis of αs1-caseins in cheeses made in August. A proteomic comparison between cheeses produced from milk taken in April, August and December showed a reduction in levels of β-casein and appearance of additional products, corresponding to low molecular weight hydrolysis products of the caseins. This study has demonstrated that a seasonal milk supply causes compositional differences in Cheddar cheese, and that proteomic tools are helpful in understanding the impact of those differences.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 2012

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