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A meta-analysis of neonatal health outcomes from oocyte donation

  • D. H. Adams (a1), R. A. Clark (a1), M. J. Davies (a2) (a3) and S. de Lacey (a1)
Abstract

Donated oocytes are a treatment modality for female infertility which is also associated with increased risks of preeclampsia. Subsequently it is important to evaluate if there is concomitant increased risks for adverse neonatal events in donated oocyte neonates. A structured search of the literature using PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Reviews was performed to investigate the perinatal health outcomes of offspring conceived from donor oocytes compared with autologous oocytes. Meta-analysis was performed on comparable outcomes data. Twenty-eight studies were eligible and included in the review, and of these, 23 were included in a meta-analysis. Donor oocyte neonates are at increased risk of being born with low birth weight (<2500 g) [risk ratio (RR): 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14–1.22, P-value (P)<0.00001], very low birth weight (<1500 g) (RR: 1.24, CI: 1.15–1.35, P<0.00001), preterm (<37 weeks) (RR: 1.26, CI: 1.23–1.30, P<0.00001), of lower gestational age (mean difference −0.3 weeks, CI: −0.35 weeks to −0.25 weeks, P<0.00001), and preterm with low birth weight (RR: 1.24, CI: 1.19–1.29, P<0.00001), when compared with autologous oocyte neonates. Conversely, low birth weight outcomes were improved in term donor oocyte neonates (RR: 0.86, CI: 0.8–0.93, P=0.0003). These negative outcomes remained significant when controlling for multiple deliveries. The donor oocyte risk rates are higher than those found in general ART outcomes, are important considerations for the counselling of infertile patients and may also influence the long term health of the offspring.

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Corresponding author
*Address for correspondence: D. H. Adams, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia. (Email: adam0072@flinders.edu.au)
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