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Analysis of compliance, morbidities and outcome in neurodevelopmental follow-up visits in urban African-American infants at environmental risk

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 November 2010

A. Perenyi
Affiliation:
Pediatrics, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA
J. Katz*
Affiliation:
Physical Therapy, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA
P. Flom
Affiliation:
Scientific Computing Center, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA
S. Regensberg
Affiliation:
Pediatrics, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA
T. Sklar
Affiliation:
Pediatrics, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA
*
*Address for correspondence: Dr J. Katz, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Ave, Box 16, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA. (Email Joanne.katz@downstate.edu)

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to determine compliance rate in a uniform, urban African-American patient population at environmental risk for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome and to define risk factors for non-compliance with neurodevelopmental follow-up. A retrospective chart review was performed which included 481 infants with birth weight (BW) of 495–4195 g and gestational ages (GAs) between 23 and 42 weeks born at our hospital. Statistical analysis was performed using the Jonckheere–Terpstra test for ordinal variables. For 2 × 2 tables, χ2 test and Fisher’s exact test (P < 0.05) were used. To determine significant predictive variables, data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression with one independent variable at a time. Infants compliant with follow-up had significantly more morbidities in the very low BW category (⩽1500 g) than infants with larger BW. The highest compliance rate (70%) was found among the smallest and most immature (GA ⩽28 weeks) infants. Based on this finding, we postulate that the number of infants with severe disability is not likely to be underestimated. The significantly more frequent developmental anomalies found in the largest BW (⩽2500 g) category raises significant concern, though findings in this subset of infants may not be representative of the whole population. There was no significant difference between the compliant and non-compliant groups regarding socio-economic status. Severe or multiple morbidities and prolonged hospital stay may provide parents with greater opportunity to learn and understand about the infant’s condition which may lead to greater compliance.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2010

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Analysis of compliance, morbidities and outcome in neurodevelopmental follow-up visits in urban African-American infants at environmental risk
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