Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

European Trade, Colonialism, and Human Capital Accumulation in Senegal, Gambia and Western Mali, 1770–1900

  • Gabriele Cappelli (a1) and Joerg Baten (a2)
Abstract

We trace the development of human capital in today's Senegal, Gambia, and Western Mali between 1770 and 1900. European trade, slavery, and early colonialism were linked to human capital formation, but this connection appears to have been heterogeneous. The contact with the Atlantic slave trade increased regional divergence, as the coast of Senegambia developed more quickly than inner areas. This pattern was affected by French early colonialism and by the reaction of different West African populations to the economic incentives provided by foreign demand for agricultural products. The peanut trade since the mid-nineteenth century further amplified regional economic inequalities.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      European Trade, Colonialism, and Human Capital Accumulation in Senegal, Gambia and Western Mali, 1770–1900
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      European Trade, Colonialism, and Human Capital Accumulation in Senegal, Gambia and Western Mali, 1770–1900
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      European Trade, Colonialism, and Human Capital Accumulation in Senegal, Gambia and Western Mali, 1770–1900
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Footnotes
Hide All

We would like to express our gratitude to William Collins and two anonymous referees for invaluable comments on the manuscript. The article has greatly benefitted from remarks provided by Ewout Frankema and Gareth Austin on early drafts. We would like to acknowledge the precious help provided by numerous research assistants, especially Bastien Buchwalter, Jorge Luis Fernández González, and Nicole Püschel. Finally, we would like to thank the participants of the Research Seminar at the Chair of Economic History of the University of Tuebingen, the 2014 ClioInfra Workshop at the University of Barcelona, and the EHES Conference 2015 in Pisa for their criticism and suggestions. Our work has been supported by the NWO ClioInfra Project and the German Science Foundation cluster SFB 1070. Cappelli also acknowledges the support of the Spanish Government through the project HAR2016-76814-C2-1-P (AEI/FEDER, UE).

Footnotes
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The Journal of Economic History
  • ISSN: 0022-0507
  • EISSN: 1471-6372
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-economic-history
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 5
Total number of PDF views: 60 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 216 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 21st August 2017 - 24th September 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.