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Are Donations to Charity an Effective Incentive for Public Officials?

  • Daniel M. Butler (a1) and Miguel M. Pereira (a2)
Extract

Incentivized experiments are frequently used to learn about individuals’ social, political, and economic behavior. However, public officials and other individuals are sometimes barred from accepting payment for anything related to their position, so money cannot be used in experiments (e.g., Butler and Kousser 2015). We assess whether donations to charity can be used to incentivize public officials, as an alternative to traditional monetary inducements.

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References
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Bullock, John G., Gerber, Alan S., Hill, Seth J., and Huber, Gregory A.. 2015. “Partisan Bias in Factual Beliefs about Politics.” Quarterly Journal of Political Science 10 (4): 519–78.
Butler, Daniel M. and Pereira, Miguel M.. 2017. “Replication Data for: Are Donations to Charity an Effective Incentive for Public Officials?” Harvard Dataverse, V3. doi: 10.7910/DVN/KSKR7F.
Butler, Daniel M. and Kousser, Thad. 2015. “How do Public Goods Providers Play Public Goods Games?Legislative Studies Quarterly 40 (2): 211–40.
Eckel, Catherine C. and Grossman, Philip J.. 2002. “Sex Differences and Statistical Stereotyping in Attitudes Toward Financial Risk.” Evolution and Human Behavior 23 (4): 281–95.
Grose, Christian R. 2014. “Field Experimental Work on Political Institutions.” Annual Review of Political Science 17 (1): 355–70.
Kam, Cindy D., Wilking, Jennifer R., and Zechmeister, Elizabeth J.. 2007. “Beyond the ‘Narrow Data Base’: Another Convenience Sample for Experimental Research.” Political Behavior 29 (4): 415–40.
Morton, Rebecca B. 2012. “Letter from the Desert.” Newsletter of the APSA Experimental Section 3 (2): 27.
Morton, Rebecca B. and Williams, Kenneth C.. 2010. Experimental Political Science and the Study of Causality: From Nature to the Lab. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Prior, Markus, Sood, Gaurav, and Khanna, Kabir. 2015. “You Cannot be Serious: The Impact of Accuracy Incentives on Partisan Bias in Reports of Economic Perceptions.” Quarterly Journal of Political Science 10 (4): 489518.
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Journal of Experimental Political Science
  • ISSN: 2052-2630
  • EISSN: 2052-2649
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-experimental-political-science
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Supplementary materials

Butler and Pereira supplementary material
Appendix A

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Supplementary materials

Butler and Pereira supplementary material
Appendix B

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