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Attitudes to Moonlighting Politicians: Evidence from the United Kingdom

  • Rosie Campbell (a1) and Philip Cowley (a2)
Abstract
Abstract

Research has explored the impact of politicians holding second jobs, or moonlighting, on their performance and recruitment, but less is known about how citizens respond to such behavior. Citizens may react negatively to Members of Parliament (MPs) moonlighting, viewing outside earnings as a conflict of interest or a distraction, or instead they might view MPs with second incomes positively, seeing them as a connection with the “real world” beyond politics. Utilizing a series of survey experiments, we assess how British citizens respond to MPs moonlighting. We demonstrate preferences more complex than those revealed by traditional survey instruments. Citizens respond to both size and source of income. They do not respond negatively to all second incomes; they are more sympathetic to the entrepreneur who continues to draw an income than medical doctors or lawyers who continue to practice. They are most hostile to politicians who take on part-time company directorships.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Nicholas Allen . 2008. “A New Ethical World of British MPs?Journal of Legislative Studies 14 (3): 297314.

Nicholas Allen . 2011a. “Dishonourable Members? Exploring Patterns of Misconduct in the Contemporary House of Commons.” British Politics 6: 210–40.

Rosie Campbell , and Philip Cowley . 2014. “What Voters Want: Reactions to Candidate Characteristics in a Survey Experiment.” Political Studies 62 (4): 745–65.

Francesco Caselli and Massimo Morelli . 2004. “Bad Politicians.” Journal of Public Economics 88 (3–4): 759–82.

Stefano Galiarducci , Tommaso Nannicini , and Paolo Naticchioni . 2010. “Moonlighting Politicians.” Journal of Public Economics 94 (9–10): 688–99.

Benny Geys and Karsten Mause . 2014. “Are Female Legislators Different? Exploring Sex Differences in German MPs’ Outside Interests.” Parliamentary Affairs 67 (4): 841–65.

Benny Geys and Karsten Mause . 2013. “Moonlighting Politicians: A Survey and Research Agenda.” Journal of Legislative Studies 19 (1): 7697.

Michael Rush . 1997. “Damming the Sleaze: The New Code of Conduct and the Outside Interests of MPs in the British House of Commons.” Journal of Legislative Studies 3 (2): 1028.

Kira Sanbonmatsu . 2002. “Gender Stereotypes and Vote Choice.” American Journal of Political Science 46 (1): 2034.

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Journal of Experimental Political Science
  • ISSN: 2052-2630
  • EISSN: 2052-2649
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-experimental-political-science
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