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The intermediate wake of a body of revolution at high Reynolds numbers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2010

JUAN M. JIMÉNEZ*
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
M. HULTMARK
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
A. J. SMITS
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
*
Present address: Institute for Medicine and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Email address for correspondence: jjimenez@upenn.edu

Abstract

Results are presented on the flow field downstream of a body of revolution for Reynolds numbers based on a model length ranging from 1.1 × 106 to 67 × 106. The maximum Reynolds number is more than an order of magnitude larger than that obtained in previous laboratory wake studies. Measurements are taken in the intermediate wake at locations 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 diameters downstream from the stern in the midline plane. The model is based on an idealized submarine shape (DARPA SUBOFF), and it is mounted in a wind tunnel on a support shaped like a semi-infinite sail. The mean velocity distributions on the side opposite the support demonstrate self-similarity at all locations and Reynolds numbers, whereas the mean velocity distribution on the side of the support displays significant effects of the support wake. None of the Reynolds stress distributions of the flow attain self-similarity, and for all except the lowest Reynolds number, the support introduces a significant asymmetry into the wake which results in a decrease in the radial and streamwise turbulence intensities on the support side. The distributions continue to evolve with downstream position and Reynolds number, although a slow approach to the expected asymptotic behaviour is observed with increasing distance downstream.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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