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Particle Verbs in the Surinamese Creoles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 August 2014

Robert Borges
Affiliation:
Radboud University Nijmegen
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Abstract

This paper shows that Dutch verb-particle constructions have been transferred into the Surinamese creole languages as a result of pervasive multilingualism and intensive contact. Particle-verb structures are, at most, marginal in the native grammar of Surinamese creoles. However, recent data show that verb-particle constructions of the Dutch sort are becoming productive and are used with some homogeneity in the creole language context.

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Copyright © Society for Germanic Linguistics 2014 

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