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Humoral immunity and output of first-stage larvae of Elaphostrongylus rangiferi (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea) by infected reindeer, Rangifer tarandus tarandus

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 November 2009

G. Gaudernack
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Biology, Institute of Medical Biology and Geology, University of Tromso, Tromso, Norway
O. Halvoresen
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Biology, Institute of Medical Biology and Geology, University of Tromso, Tromso, Norway
A. Skorping
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Biology, Institute of Medical Biology and Geology, University of Tromso, Tromso, Norway
K. A. Stokkan
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Biology, Institute of Medical Biology and Geology, University of Tromso, Tromso, Norway

Abstract

The use of an indirect immunofluorescence technique demonstrated that serum from reindeer, Rangifer tarandus tarandus, infected with Elaphostrongylus rangiferi (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea) contained antibodies directed against antigen(s) on the cuticle of the parasites first-stage larvae (LI). Output of LI from the male reindeer was low in the period June to August, but increased to a higher level during the rutting season (September to October). The titre of specific antibody showed an inverse pattern. In the female reindeer, larval output remained high throughout the sampling period from January to July. During this period antibody titre was low. A relationship between stress (rutting season or calving period), immunity and larval output is suggested.

Type
Research Note
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1984

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Humoral immunity and output of first-stage larvae of Elaphostrongylus rangiferi (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea) by infected reindeer, Rangifer tarandus tarandus
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Humoral immunity and output of first-stage larvae of Elaphostrongylus rangiferi (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea) by infected reindeer, Rangifer tarandus tarandus
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Humoral immunity and output of first-stage larvae of Elaphostrongylus rangiferi (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea) by infected reindeer, Rangifer tarandus tarandus
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