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The occurrence of Dirofilaria immitis, Borrelia burgdorferi, Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophium in dogs in China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2011

Z. Xia*
Affiliation:
Internal Medicine Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing, People's Republic of China
D. Yu
Affiliation:
Internal Medicine Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing, People's Republic of China
J. Mao
Affiliation:
Shanghai Family Pet Hospital, Shanghai, People's Republic of China
Z. Zhang
Affiliation:
Beijing Aikang Pet Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China
J. Yu
Affiliation:
Animal Department, Beijing Aquarium, Beijing, People's Republic of China
*
*Fax: +86 −010-62732804 E-mail: drxia@126.com

Abstract

A survey of the occurrence of Dirofilaria immitis, Borrelia burgdorferi, Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophium in dogs was undertaken in the People's Republic of China between October 2008 and October 2009. A total of 600 blood samples were taken from dogs in four cities in China: 300 in Beijing, 150 in Shenzhen, 30 in Shanghai and 120 in Zhengzhou. All samples were tested for the heartworm antigen and antibodies of canine B. burgdorferi, E. canis and A. phagocytophium by using the canine SNAP® 4Dx® test kit. The occurrence of D. immitis, B. burgdorferi, E. canis and A. phagocytophium was 1.17% (7/600), 0.17% (1/600), 2.17% (13/600) and 0.5% (3/600), respectively. In Shenzhen city 2% (3/150), 8.67% (13/150) and 2% (3/150) of samples were positive for D. immitis, E. canis and A. phagocytophium, respectively. The occurrence of heartworm antigen was 0.33% (1/300) in Beijing, 2.00% (3/150) in Shenzhen, 3.33% (1/30) in Shanghai and 1.67% (2/120) in Zhengzhou. We found E. canis and A. phagocytophium only at one site, Shenzhen, while the only occurrence of B. burgdorferi was at Beijing. In conclusion, the dog population in China is at potential risk for D. immitis, B. burgdorferi, E. canis and A. phagocytophium infection, the risk being especially high in southern China.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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References

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