Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-66d7dfc8f5-zf4m4 Total loading time: 0.394 Render date: 2023-02-08T20:11:32.365Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Aristotle on agency, habits and institutions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 April 2016

RICARDO F. CRESPO*
Affiliation:
Department of Economics, IAE (Universidad Austral) and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Pilar, Argentina

Abstract

This paper introduces Aristotle's conception of agency, habits and institutions as a way of contributing to some current discussions about the definition, nature and theory of institutions. Aristotle developed a theory of human action, where we can find a place for ‘agency’. His views on habits are linked to his theory of virtue and art (skill). Concerning institutions, Aristotle provides a sound social and political philosophy that encompasses the nature and role of institutions. The paper will subsequently present Aristotle's ideas on these three notions – agency, habits and institutions – and will finally establish which of the current accounts of institutions involved in the discussion sparked by Hindriks and Guala's recent paper (2005a) he would support. Given that some realities tackled in the paper are nowadays radically different from Aristotle's times, the paper tries to keep an ‘Aristotelian-minded’ point of view – that is, analysing current topics based on Aristotelian concepts.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Millennium Economics Ltd 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Annas, J. (2011), Intelligent Virtue, Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aoki, M. (2015), ‘Why is the Equilibrium Notion Essential for A Unified Institutional Theory? A Friendly Remark on the Article by Hindriks and Guala’, Journal of Institutional Economics, 11 (3): 485488.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aristotle. (1954), Nicomachean Ethics, Ross, D. (ed.), Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Aristotle. (1999), Nicomachean Ethics, Irwin, T. (ed.), (2nd ed.), Indianapólis and Cambridge: Hackett.Google Scholar
Aristotle. (1943), Politics, Jowett, B. (ed.), New York: Random House.Google Scholar
Aristotle. (1958), Politics, Barker, E. (ed.), Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google ScholarPubMed
Aristotle. (1995), The Complete Works of Aristotle. The Revised Oxford Translation, Barnes, J. (ed.), Princeton: Princeton University Press, 6th printing with corrections.Google Scholar
Bicchieri, C. (2014), ‘Norms, Conventions, and the Power of Expectations’, in Cartwright, Nancy and Montuschi, Eleonora (eds.), Philosophy of Social Science. A New Introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 208229.Google Scholar
Binmore, K. (2015), ‘Institutions, Rules and Equilibria: A Commentary’, Journal of Institutional Economics, 11 (3): 493496.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boudon, R. (2004), ‘Théorie du Choix Rationnel, Théorie de La Rationalité Limitée ou Individualisme Méthodologique: Que Choisir?’, Journal des Economistes et des Etudes Humaines, 14 (1): 4562.Google Scholar
Burnyeat, M. F. (1980), ‘Aristotle on Learning to Be Good’, in Rorty, A. O. (ed.), Essays on Aristotle's Ethics, Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Colman, A. J. (2004), ‘Reasoning About Strategic Interaction. Solution Concepts in Game Theory’, in Psychology of Reasoning, Manktelow, K. I. and Chung, M. C. (eds.), Hove and New York: Psychology Press (Taylor & Francis), pp. 287308.Google Scholar
Hindriks, F. and Guala, F. (2015a), ‘Institutions, Rules, and Equilibria. A Unified Theory’, Journal of Institutional Economics, 11 (3): 459480.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hindriks, F. and Guala, F. (2015b), ‘Understanding Institution: Replies to Aoki, Binmore, Hodgson, Searle, Smith, and Sugden’, Journal of Institutional Economics, 11 (3): 515522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hodgson, G. M. (2004), ‘Reclaiming Habit for Institutional Economics’, Journal of Economic Psychology, 25 (5): 651660.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hodgson, G. M. (2006), ‘What Are Institutions?’, Journal of Economic Issues, XL (1): 125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hodgson, G. M. (2015), ‘On Defining Institutions: Rules Versus Equilibria’, Journal of Institutional Economics, 11 (3): 497505.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hughes, G. (2013), The Routledge Guidebook to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar
Lear, J. (1988), Aristotle: the Desire to Understand, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lockwood, T. C. (2013), ‘Habituation, Habit, and Character in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics ’, in Sparrow, T. and Hutchison, A. (eds.), A History of Habit: From Aristotle to Bourdieu, Langham: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
MacIntyre, A. (1984), After Virtue, (2nd ed.), Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press.Google Scholar
Marx, K. ([1887]1965), Le Capital, in Oeuvres. Economie, édition établie par, Marx, K. and Rubel, M. (eds.), Paris: Gallimard.Google Scholar
Searle, J. R. (2005), ‘What is an Institution?’, Journal of Institutional Economics, 1 (1): 122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Searle, J. R. (2015), ‘Status Functions and Institutional Facts. Reply to Hindriks and Guala’, Journal of Institutional Economics, 11 (3): 507514.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sen, A. (2002), Rationality and Freedom, Cambridge MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University.Google Scholar
Simon, H. A. (1979), ‘Rational Decision Making in Business Organizations’, The American Economic Review, 69 (4): 493513.Google Scholar
Smith, V. (2015), ‘Conducts, Rules, and the Origins of Institutions’, Journal of Institutional Economics, 11 (3): 481483.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sugden, R. (2015), ‘On “Common-Sense” Ontology: A Comment on the Paper by Frank Hindriks and Francesco Guala’, Journal of Institutional Economics, 11 (3): 489492.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weber, M. (1978), Economy and Society, in Roth, G. and Wittich, C. (eds.), Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
2
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Aristotle on agency, habits and institutions
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Aristotle on agency, habits and institutions
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Aristotle on agency, habits and institutions
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *