Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-c97xr Total loading time: 0.214 Render date: 2022-05-25T21:05:58.499Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

The Politics of NAFTA in Mexico

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Guy Poitras
Affiliation:
Trinity University in San Antonio (TX)
Raymond Robertson
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Austin

Extract

For much of the twentieth century, Third World economies that were based upon import-substitution industrialization (ISI) were dominated by authoritarian regimes. When economic liberalization began to overtake many of these countries, however, as happened in recent years, the question arose as to whether authoritarian rule had not become anachronistic in mediating the relations between state and economy in the Third World.

The experience of Mexico strongly suggests that authoritarian rule remains a potent force in this era of economic change. Although Mexico's authoritarian government continued to retain power even in the presence of a liberal economic agenda, adopted during the early 1990s, it did find it expedient to make some adaptations in the system. The most significant of these, by far, was to make alterations in the ruling coalition that had governed the country since the early 1930s, rather than to embark upon a transition to democracy. These changes represented the regime's most critical initiative in attempting to meet, if not reconcile, the conflicting claims of authoritarianism on the one hand with the demands of economic liberalization on the other.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © University of Miami 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Ames, B. (1987) Political Survival: Politicians and Public Policy in Latin America. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Baer, D. (1991) “North American Free Trade.Foreign Affairs 70, 4 (Fall): 132149.Google Scholar
Bizberg, I. (1990) “La Crisis del Corporativismo Mexicano.Foro Internacional 30 (abril-junio): 695735.Google Scholar
Brachet-marquez, V. (1992) “Explaining Sociopolitical Change in Latin America: The Case of Mexico.Latin American Research Review 27, 3: 91122.Google Scholar
Burkholder, R. (1991) “Americans and Mexicans Support North American Free Trade Zone, Canadians Opposed.Gallup Poll Monthly (April): 2728.Google Scholar
Cámara Nacional de la Industria de Transformación (Canacintra) (1985) Posición de Canacintra en torno al Gatt (noviembre). Mexico (DF), México: Dirección de Estudios Económicos.Google Scholar
Cardenas, C. (1991) “Free Trade Is Not Enough.New Perspectives Quarterly 8, 1 (Winter): 2122.Google Scholar
Castañeda, J. (1990) “Salinas’ International Relations Gamble.Journal of International Affairs 43, 2 (Winter): 407422.Google Scholar
Castañeda, J. and Heredia, C. (1993) “haciaotrotlc.Cuadernos de Nexos 181 (enero): 4354.Google Scholar
Cornelius, W., Gentleman, J., and Smith, P. (1989) “Overview: The Dynamics of Political Change in Mexico,” pp. 151 in Cornelius, Wayne A., Gentleman, Judith, and Smith, Peter H. (eds.) Mexico's Alternative Political Futures (Monograph Series 30). La Jolla, CA: Center for US-Mexican Studies, University of California at San Diego.Google Scholar
(El) Cotidiano (1991) “La posición de organizaciones sociales y politica de ambos lados de la frontera frente al Tlc.” Mayo/ junio: 1519.Google Scholar
Cuadernos de Nexos (1990) “Encuestalia ¿Quién le teme al libre comercio?Number 151 (July): vivii.Google Scholar
Cypher, J. (1990) State and Capital in Mexico: Development Policy since 1940. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.Google Scholar
Dresser, D. (1991) “Commentary: Unidos para progresar.” Business Mexico 1, 8 (October): 3539.Google Scholar
Durand Ponte, V. (1990) “Neocardenismo y transición política,” pp. 155182 in Chac, Manuel Canto and Durand Ponte, Victor M. (eds.) Política y Gobierno en la Transición Mexicana. México (DF), Mexico: Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana.Google Scholar
Este País (1991) “Pronasol: Diferencias de apoyo por estratos y sectores.” Octubre: 910.Google Scholar
Federal Broadcast Information Service - Latin America (FBIS-LAT) (1990) “Cárdenas Opposes Trade Agreement with US,” Notlmex, 13 June 1990; in FBIS-LAT 90115, 14 June: 1112.Google Scholar
Galarza, G. (1992) “El texto con corchetes del TLC, negociado en Dallas, llegó al Congreso por vía privada.” Proceso (30 marzo): 610.Google Scholar
Gil Villegas, F. (1991) “Legitimidad y Consenso Politico.Examen 3, 31 (diciembre): 2830.Google Scholar
Gonzalez, H., A., (1992) Author interview with the Director of Economic Studies, Secretaría de Comercio y Fomento Industrial (SECOFI); Mexico City; 19 January.Google Scholar
Gonzalez Sousa, L. (1990) “Mexico ante la integración de Norteamerica: Entre la democracía y el vasallaje,” pp. 241259 in Bernal Sahagun, Victor M. et al. (eds.) La Integración Comercial de México a Estados Unidos y Canada: ¿Altemativa o Destino? México (DF), México: Siglo Vientiuno Editores.Google Scholar
Gonzales Tiburcio, E. (1991) “Pronasol: Hacia la nueva sintesis.” Cuadernos de Nexos 40 (octubre): x.Google Scholar
Los Angeles Times (1991) “Progress and Promise” (A World Report Special Section). (22 October): H1-H10.Google Scholar
Lustig, N. (1992) Mexico: The Remaking of an Economy. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution.Google Scholar
Macias Garcia, R. (1992) Author interview with subdirector of Direccion de Inversión Extranjera (Coece); Mexico City (Mexico); 29 January.Google Scholar
(El) Mercado de Valores (1992a) “Resultadas de la Negociación del Tratado de Libre Comercio.” Number 28 (octubre 1): ixii.Google Scholar
(El) Mercado de Valores (1992b) “Resultados de la Negociación del Tratado de Libre Comercio.Number 27 (septiembre 15): ixii.Google Scholar
(El) Mercado de Valores (1992c) “Tratado de Libre Comercio.Number 9 (mayo 1): ix.Google Scholar
(El) Mercado de Valores (1991a) “Informe Numero Uno sobre el Tratado de Libre Comercio.” Number 14 (julio 15): iiv.Google Scholar
(El) Mercado de Valores (1991b) “Informe Numero 1 sobre el Tratado de Libre Comercio.” Number 13 (julio 1): iiv.Google Scholar
Meyer, L. (1989) “Democratization of the Pri: Mission Impossible?,” pp. 325348 in Cornelius, Wayne A., Gentleman, Judith, and Smith, Peter H. (eds.) Mexico's Alternative Political Futures. La Jolla, CA: Center for US-Mexican Studies, University of California at San Diego.Google Scholar
Mora Martinez, M. (1992) “No hay oposición entre empresarios y gobierno, dijo Nicolas Madahuar Camara.” El Financiero (20 de mayo): 21.Google Scholar
Morris, S. (1992) “Political Reformism in Mexico: Salinas at the Brink.Journal of Interamerican Studies and World Affairs 34, 1 (Spring): 2758.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
(El) Nacional (1991) de Julio: 2829.Google Scholar
Purcell, S. K. (1992)“Mexico's New Economic Vitality.Current History 91, 562 (February): S4-58.Google Scholar
Purcell, S. K. (1990) “US-Mexican Relations: An Optimistic View.Journal of International Affairs 43, 2 (Winter): 423429.Google Scholar
Robertson, R. (1992) “Economic Recovery Passes Over Street Vendors.” El Financiero Internacional (29 June): 10.Google Scholar
Rodriguez, R. (1991) “Graves Riesgos Enfrenta la Microindustria.” Actividad (diciembre): 1821.Google Scholar
Rodriguez Reyna, I. (1992) “Inconformidad en el sector privado sobre la forma en que se esta negociando al Tratado.” El Financiero (16 de febrero): 14.Google Scholar
Rubio, L. (1993) “Los Limites del Cambio Politico.Cuademos de Nexos 187 (julio): 6368.Google Scholar
Sanchez, J. (1992) “Fusión de los sectores obrero y campesino, anuncia Borrego.El Financiero (15 de mayo): 32.Google Scholar
Silva Herzog, J. (1991) “Why the Rush to Free Trade?New Perspectives Quarterly 8, 1 (Winter): 2932.Google Scholar
Smith, P. (1992) “The Political Impact of Free Trade on Mexico.Journal of Interamerican Studies and World Affairs 34, 1 (Spring): 126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Story, D. (1986) “Trade Politics in the Third World: A Case Study of the Mexican Gatt Decision.International Organization 36, 4 (Autumn): 767794.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Teichman, J. (1992) “The Mexican State and the Political Implications of Economic Restructuring.Latin American Perspectives 19, 2 (Spring): 88104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weintraub, S. and Baer, M. D. (1992) “The Interplay between Economic and Political Opening: The Sequence in Mexico.Washington Quarterly 15, 2 (Spring): 187204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Politics of NAFTA in Mexico
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The Politics of NAFTA in Mexico
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The Politics of NAFTA in Mexico
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *