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Aryepiglottoplasty for laryngomalacia: the Alder Hey experience

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2006

J E Martin
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, Liverpool, UK
K E Howarth
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, Liverpool, UK
I Khodaei
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, Liverpool, UK
A Karkanevatos
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, Liverpool, UK
R W Clarke
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, Liverpool, UK

Abstract

Laryngomalacia is the most common cause of stridor in infants. Severely affected children are at risk of feeding difficulties, apnoeic episodes and cor pulmonale secondary to upper airway obstruction. The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of aryepiglottoplasty. This is a simple surgical procedure that relieves the obstruction by dividing the aryepiglottic folds. Thirty children had an aryepiglottoplasty at the Royal Liverpool Children’s Hospital between January 1995 and June 2001. The case notes of all 30 children were reviewed for age, sex, age at operation, indications, operative technique, complications and long-term outcomes. Complete resolution of stridor was obtained in 83 per cent of patients, with an improvement in a further 7 per cent. Post-operative complications included lower respiratory tract infections (13 per cent) and vomiting (7 per cent). In conclusion, simple endoscopic aryepiglottoplasty remains an effective way of treating upper airway obstruction in children. Its high resolution and low complication rate make it a safe, first choice procedure for treatment of moderate to severe laryngomalacia.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2005 Royal Society of Medicine Press

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