Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-65dc7cd545-7xdgm Total loading time: 0.302 Render date: 2021-07-26T02:44:59.548Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Betadine has a ciliotoxic effect on ciliated human respiratory cells

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2014

J H Kim
Affiliation:
Rhinology and Skull Base Research Group, St. Vincent's Centre for Applied Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales, Australia
J Rimmer
Affiliation:
St. Vincent's Hospital Sydney, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, Glebe, New South Wales, Australia
N Mrad
Affiliation:
Rhinology and Skull Base Research Group, St. Vincent's Centre for Applied Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia
S Ahmadzada
Affiliation:
Rhinology and Skull Base Research Group, St. Vincent's Centre for Applied Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia Department of Medicine, University of Notre Dame Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia
R J Harvey
Affiliation:
Rhinology and Skull Base Research Group, St. Vincent's Centre for Applied Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales, Australia St. Vincent's Hospital Sydney, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia The Australian School of Advanced Medicine, Macquarie University, Macquarie Park, New South Wales, Australia
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Get access

Abstract

Objective:

This study investigated the effect of Betadine on ciliated human respiratory epithelial cells.

Methods:

Epithelial cells from human sinonasal mucosa were cultured at the air–liquid interface. The cultures were tested with Hanks' balanced salt solution containing 10 mM HEPES (control), 100 µM ATP (positive control), 5 per cent Betadine or 10 per cent Betadine (clinical dose). Ciliary beat frequency was analysed using a high-speed camera on a computer imaging system.

Results:

Undiluted 10 per cent Betadine (n = 6) decreased the proportion of actively beating cilia over 1 minute (p < 0.01). Ciliary beat frequency decreased from 11.15 ± 4.64 Hz to no detectable activity. The result was similar with 5 per cent Betadine (n = 7), with no significant difference compared with the 10 per cent solution findings.

Conclusion:

Betadine, at either 5 and 10 per cent, was ciliotoxic. Caution should be applied to the use of topical Betadine solution on the respiratory mucosal surface.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2014 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1Chin, D, Harvey, RJ. Nasal polyposis: an inflammatory condition requiring effective anti-inflammatory treatment. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2013;21:2330CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2Rudmik, L, Hoy, M, Schlosser, RJ, Harvey, RJ, Welch, KC, Lund, V et al. Topical therapies in the management of chronic rhinosinusitis: an evidence-based review with recommendations. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol 2013;3:281–98CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3Harvey, RJ, Psaltis, A, Schlosser, RJ, Witterick, IJ. Current concepts in topical therapy for chronic sino-nasal disease. J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2009;39:217–31Google Scholar
4Thomas, WW, Harvey, RJ, Rudmik, L, Hwang, PH, Schlosser, RJ. Distribution of topical agents to the paranasal sinuses: an evidence-based review with recommendations. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol 2013;3:691703CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5Raza, T, Elsherif, HS, Zulianello, L, Plouin-Gaudon, I, Landis, BN, Lacroix, JS. Nasal lavage with sodium hypochlorite solution in Staphylococcus aureus persistent rhinosinusitis. Rhinology 2008;46:1522Google Scholar
6Rombaux, P, Collet, S, Hamoir, M, Eloy, P, Bertrand, B, Jamart, F et al. The role of nasal cavity disinfection in the bacteriology of chronic sinusitis. Rhinology 2005;43:125–9Google ScholarPubMed
7Gottardi, W. Iodine and iodine compounds. In: Block, SS, ed. Disinfection, Sterilization and Preservation. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1983;183–96Google Scholar
8Gosepath, J, Grebneva, N, Mossikhin, S, Mann, WJ. Topical antibiotic, antifungal, and antiseptic solutions decrease ciliary activity in nasal respiratory cells. Am J Rhinol 2000;14:411–18CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9LeSimple, P, van Seuningen, I, Buisine, MP, Copin, MC, Hinz, M, Hoffmann, W et al. Trefoil factor family 3 peptide promotes human airway epithelial ciliated cell differentiation. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 2007;36:296303CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10Dimova, S, Brewster, ME, Noppe, M, Jorissen, M, Augustijns, P. The use of human nasal in vitro cell systems during drug discovery and development. Toxicol In Vitro 2005;19:107–22CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11Antunes, MB, Woodworth, BA, Bhargave, G, Xiong, G, Aguilar, JL, Ratner, AJ et al. Murine nasal septa for respiratory epithelial air-liquid interface cultures. Biotechniques 2007;43:195204CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12Woodworth, B, Zhang, S, Tamashiro, E, Bhargave, G, Palmer, J, Cohen, NA. Zinc increases ciliary beat frequency in a calcium-dependent manner. Am J Rhinol Allergy 2010;24:610CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13Shen, JC, Cope, E, Chen, B, Leid, JG, Cohen, NA. Regulation of murine sinonasal cilia function by microbial secreted factors. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol 2012;2:104–10CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14Green, A, Smallman, LA, Logan, ACM, Drake-Lee, AB. The effect of temperature on nasal ciliary beat frequency. Clin Otolaryngol 1995;20:178–80CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
15Lieb, T, Frei, CW, Frohock, JI, Bookman, RJ, Salathe, M. Prolonged increase in ciliary beat frequency after short-term purinergic stimulation in human airway epithelial cells. J Physiol 2002;538:633–46CrossRefGoogle Scholar
25
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Betadine has a ciliotoxic effect on ciliated human respiratory cells
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Betadine has a ciliotoxic effect on ciliated human respiratory cells
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Betadine has a ciliotoxic effect on ciliated human respiratory cells
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *