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Development of an auditory implant manipulator for minimally invasive surgical insertion of implantable hearing devices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 November 2010

C Stieger
Affiliation:
ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern, Switzerland University Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, Inselspital Bern, Switzerland
M Caversaccio*
Affiliation:
University Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, Inselspital Bern, Switzerland
A Arnold
Affiliation:
University Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, Inselspital Bern, Switzerland
G Zheng
Affiliation:
ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern, Switzerland
J Salzmann
Affiliation:
ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern, Switzerland
D Widmer
Affiliation:
ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern, Switzerland
N Gerber
Affiliation:
ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern, Switzerland
M Thurner
Affiliation:
Microrobotics Laboratory, University of Applied Science, Biel, Switzerland
C Nauer
Affiliation:
Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Inselspital, University of Bern, Switzerland
Y Mussard
Affiliation:
Microrobotics Laboratory, University of Applied Science, Biel, Switzerland
M Kompis
Affiliation:
University Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, Inselspital Bern, Switzerland
L P Nolte
Affiliation:
ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern, Switzerland
R Häusler
Affiliation:
University Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, Inselspital Bern, Switzerland
S Weber
Affiliation:
ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern, Switzerland
*
Address for correspondence: Prof Dr Marco Caversaccio, Chairman, University Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, Inselspital/University Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland Fax: + 41 31 632 88 08 E-mail: marco.caversaccio@insel.ch

Abstract

Objective:

To present the auditory implant manipulator, a navigation-controlled mechanical and electronic system which enables minimally invasive (‘keyhole’) transmastoid access to the tympanic cavity.

Materials and methods:

The auditory implant manipulator is a miniaturised robotic system with five axes of movement and an integrated drill. It can be mounted on the operating table. We evaluated the surgical work field provided by the system, and the work sequence involved, using an anatomical whole head specimen.

Results:

The work field provided by the auditory implant manipulator is considerably greater than required for conventional mastoidectomy. The work sequence for a keyhole procedure included pre-operative planning, arrangement of equipment, the procedure itself and post-operative analysis.

Conclusion:

Although system improvements are necessary, our preliminary results indicate that the auditory implant manipulator has the potential to perform keyhole insertion of implantable hearing devices.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2010

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References

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