Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-ntdpv Total loading time: 0.247 Render date: 2022-01-28T02:37:14.155Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

A role for panendoscopy? Second primary tumour in early stage squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 February 2015

K Koo
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, The University of Melbourne, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
R Harris*
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, UK
D Wiesenfeld
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, The University of Melbourne, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
T A Iseli
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, The University of Melbourne, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
*
Address for correspondence: Mr Richard Harris, Department of Otolaryngology, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Barrack Rd, Exeter EX2 5DW, UK E-mail: richardharris3@nhs.net

Abstract

Background:

Panendoscopy is routinely used for the identification of occult second primary tumours in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, its role in low risk subgroups, particularly non-smoking, non-drinking patients and patients presenting with early stage oral cavity lesions, is debatable.

Methods:

The records of 112 patients with T1 or T2 oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic, disease characteristics and survival data were collected.

Results:

Average follow-up duration was 71.7 months (range, 3.6–238.3 months). Thirty-five patients died within this period. Thirteen second primary events were identified in 11 patients, with all but 2 tumours in the oral cavity or oropharynx. There was a single synchronous primary – a lung adenocarcinoma; all other events were metachronous. No non-smoking, non-drinking patients re-presented with a second primary tumour; tobacco and alcohol use are clearly risk factors for development of a second primary tumour.

Conclusion:

The role of panendoscopy for identifying synchronous primary tumours in patients with early stage oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma should be re-evaluated, particularly in non-smoking, non-drinking patients who are at low risk of second primary development. Close follow up with regular clinical examination including flexible fibre-optic endoscopy may be sufficient in this subgroup.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2015 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1Chuang, SC, Scelo, G, Tonita, JM, Tamaro, S, Jonasson, JG, Kliewer, EV et al. Risk of second primary cancer among patients with head and neck cancers: a pooled analysis of 13 cancer registries. Int J Cancer 2008;123:2390–6CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2Slaughter, DP, Southwick, HW, Smejkal, W. Field cancerization in oral stratified squamous epithelium; clinical implications of multicentric origin. Cancer 1953;6:963–83.0.CO;2-Q>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3Braakhuis, BJ, Leemans, CR, Brakenhoff, RH. A genetic progression model of oral cancer: current evidence and clinical implications. J Oral Pathol Med 2004;33:317–22CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4Graff, P, Schipman, B, Desandes, E, Mecellem, H, Toussaint, B, Cortese, S et al. Management of patients with head and neck tumours presenting at diagnosis with a synchronous second cancer at another anatomic site. Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol) 2011;23:174–81CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5Pfister, DG, Ang, KK, Brizel, DM, Burtness, BA, Busse, PM, Caudell, JJ et al. Head and neck cancers, version 2. 2013. Featured updates to the NCCN guidelines. J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2013;11:917–23CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6Stoeckli, SJ, Zimmermann, R, Schmid, S. Role of routine panendoscopy in cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2001;124:208–12CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7Postma, GN, Bach, KK, Belafsky, PC, Koufman, JA. The role of transnasal esophagoscopy in head and neck oncology. Laryngoscope 2002;112:2242–3CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8Davidson, J, Gilbert, R, Irish, J, Witterick, I, Brown, D, Birt, D et al. The role of panendoscopy in the management of mucosal head and neck malignancy--a prospective evaluation. Head Neck 2000;22:449–54; discussion 454–53.0.CO;2-L>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9Rodriguez-Bruno, K, Ali, MJ, Wang, SJ. Role of panendoscopy to identify synchronous second primary malignancies in patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Head Neck 2011;33:949–53CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10Day, GL, Blot, WJ, Shore, RE, McLaughlin, JK, Austin, DF, Greenberg, RS et al. Second cancers following oral and pharyngeal cancers: role of tobacco and alcohol. J Natl Cancer Inst 1994;86:131–7CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11Farshadpour, F, Hordijk, GJ, Koole, R, Slootweg, PJ. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in non-smoking and non-drinking patients with multiple tumors: etiologic significance of p53 and Ki-67 in non-tumorous epithelium. J Oral Pathol Med 2008;37:549–54CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12Koo, K, Barrowman, R, McCullough, M, Iseli, T, Wiesenfeld, D. Non-smoking non-drinking elderly females: a clinically distinct subgroup of oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2013;42:929–33CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13Greene, FL, Page, DL, Fleming, ID, Fritz, A, Balch, CM, Haller, DG et al. , eds. AJCC Cancer Staging Manual, 6th edn. New York: Springer-Verlag, 2002CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14Warren, S, Gates, O. Multiple primary malignant tumours. A survey of the literature and a statistical study. Am J Cancer 1932;16:1358–414Google Scholar
15Wennervaldt, K, Melchiors, J. Risk of perforation using rigid oesophagoscopy in the distal part of oesophagus. Dan Med J 2012;59:A4528Google ScholarPubMed
11
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A role for panendoscopy? Second primary tumour in early stage squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

A role for panendoscopy? Second primary tumour in early stage squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

A role for panendoscopy? Second primary tumour in early stage squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *