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Actions Necessary to Prevent Childhood Obesity: Creating the Climate for Change

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2021

Extract

After years of near total neglect, the problem of childhood obesity is now in the limelight. Terms like “epidemic,” “crisis,” and “emergency” are used frequently when describing the trend. Progress is defined with strong language (e.g., the need for a “war” on obesity) and fueled by statistics such as the observation that this generation of children will be the first to live shorter lives than their parents. Multi-disciplinary journals such as the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics have dedicated symposiums to the issue, and conferences have been convened not only by health professionals but by government agencies, the food industry, and even professionals who market to children. The seriousness of childhood obesity is no longer in doubt, and finally attention has turned to the more complex question – what must be done?

Type
Symposium
Copyright
Copyright © American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 2007

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