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Key Opinion Leaders and the Corruption of Medical Knowledge: What the Sunshine Act Will and Won’t Cast Light on

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2021

Extract

In 2010, in connection with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), the United States Congress passed the Physician Payment Sunshine Act. This legislation requires pharmaceutical companies, medical device companies, and other manufacturers of medical supplies to collect information on their payments to physicians, beginning on August 1, 2013, and to annually report this information to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), beginning on March 31, 2014. All payments of over $10 are to be reported and aggregate payments of more than $100 to a single physician in a single year must also be reported.

Type
Symposium
Copyright
Copyright © American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 2013

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References

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