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Gas-phase combustion synthesis of titanium boride (TiB2) nanocrystallites

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

R. L. Axelbaum
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130
D. P. DuFaux
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130
C. A. Frey
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130
K. F. Kelton
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130
S. A. Lawton
Affiliation:
McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, St. Louis, Missouri 63166
L. J. Rosen
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130
S. M. L. Sastry
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130
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Abstract

Two techniques are described for synthesizing nanometer-sized TiB2 particles by gas-phase combustion reactions of sodium vapor with TiCl4 and BCl3: a low-pressure, low-temperature burner and a high-temperature flow reactor. Both methods produce TiB2 particles that are less than 15 nm in diameter. The combustion by-product, NaCl, is efficiently removed from the TiB2 by water washing or vacuum sublimation. Material collected from the low-temperature burner and annealed at 1000 °C consists of loosely agglomerated particles 20 to 100 nm in size. Washed material from the high-temperature flow reactor consists of necked agglomerates of 3 to 15 nm particles. A thermodynamic analysis of the Ti/B/Cl/Na system indicates that near 100% yields of TiB2 are possible with appropriate reactant concentrations, pressures, and temperatures.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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