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Mechanical properties of highly porous alumina foams

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 May 2013

Benedikt Simon Michael Seeber*
Affiliation:
Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland
Urs Thomas Gonzenbach
Affiliation:
Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland
Ludwig Julius Gauckler
Affiliation:
Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: ben.seeber@mat.ethz.ch
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Abstract

The mechanical properties of porous ceramics are greatly influenced by their microstructure. Therefore, mechanical behavior of highly porous ceramics is different from that of dense ceramics. In this work, we evaluate different mechanical testing methods such as static compression, Brazilian disc test and 3-point bending on their suitability for comparison of highly porous ceramic materials. It is shown that 3-point bending is more suitable than static compression or Brazilian disc testing, as the material exhibits no critical crack propagation under compressive loading. With 3-point bending tests, a quantitative comparison of the mechanical properties of foams with different microstructures and porosities is possible. Under cyclic compression the foams exhibit a very high degree of crack tolerance in combination with preservation of their structural integrity even at high strains of 10%.

Type
Invited Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

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References

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