Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-727vs Total loading time: 0.324 Render date: 2022-12-01T16:02:44.151Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Micro/nanomechanical and tribological characterization of ultrathin amorphous carbon coatings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Xiaodong Li
Affiliation:
Computer Microtribology and Contamination Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1107
Bharat Bhushan
Affiliation:
Computer Microtribology and Contamination Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1107
Get access

Abstract

Micro/nanomechanical and tribological characterization of ultrathin amorphous carbon coatings, deposited by filtered cathodic arc (FCA), direct ion beam (IB), electron cyclotron resonance plasma chemical vapor deposition (ECR-CVD), and sputter (SP) deposition processes on Si substrate have been conducted using a nanoindenter with a nanoscratch attachment and an accelerated ball-on-flat tribometer. Coating thicknesses of 20, 10, 5 nm and, for the first time, 3.5 nm coatings have been investigated. It was found the FCA coating exhibits the highest hardness and elastic modulus, followed by the ECR-CVD, IB, and SP coatings. In general, the thicker coatings exhibited better scratch/wear performance than the thinner coatings due to their better load-carrying capacity as compared to the thinner coatings. At 20 nm, the FCA and ECR-CVD coatings show the best scratch and wear resistance, while the IB and ECR-CVD coatings show the best scratch and wear resistance at 10 nm. Five nanometer thick coatings show reasonable scratch and wear resistance, while 3.5 nm thick coatings show extremely low load-carrying capacity and poor scratch and wear resistance. It appears that the 3.5 nm coatings studied are unfeasible for scratch and wear resistance applications as of now.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

1.Lettington, A. H., Carbon 36, 555560 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2.Gupta, B. K. and Bhushan, B., Wear 190, 110122 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3.Bhushan, B. and Koinkar, V. N., Surf. Coat. Technol. 76–77, 655669 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4.Patton, S. T. and Bhushan, B., Wear 202, 99109 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5.Bhushan, B., Tribology and Mechanics of Magnetic Storage Devices, 2nd ed. (Springer-Verlag, New York, 1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6.Bhushan, B., Proc. 9th Annual Workshop on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE, New York, 1996), pp. 9198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7.Tribology Issues and Opportunities in MEMS, edited by Bhushan, B. (Kluwer Academic Pub., Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8.Bhushan, B., Handbook of Micro/Nanotribology, 2nd ed. (CRC, Boca Raton, FL, 1999).Google Scholar
9.Gupta, B. K. and Bhushan, B., Thin Solid Films 270, 391398 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10.Li, X. and Bhushan, B., Wear 220, 5158 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11.Suzuki, J. and Okada, S., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 34, 12181220 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12.Bull, S. J., Diam. Relat. Mater. 4, 827836 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13.Bhushan, B., Gupta, B. K., and Azarian, M., Wear 181–183, 743758 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14.Holmberg, K. and Matthews, A., Coatings Tribology: Properties, Techniques and Applications in Surface Engineering (Elsevier, New York, 1994).Google Scholar
15.Bhushan, B. and Gupta, B. K., Handbook of Tribology: Materials, Coatings and Surface Treatments (Krieger Publishing, Malabar, FL, 1997).Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Micro/nanomechanical and tribological characterization of ultrathin amorphous carbon coatings
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Micro/nanomechanical and tribological characterization of ultrathin amorphous carbon coatings
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Micro/nanomechanical and tribological characterization of ultrathin amorphous carbon coatings
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *