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Drugs and Personality

I. Theory and Methodology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 February 2018

H. J. Eysenck*
Affiliation:
University of London, Institute of Psychiatry, Maudsley Hospital ∗

Extract

Few people would be inclined to underrate the actual, and, even more, the potential contribution which the study of the effects of drugs on personality can make to psychiatry. The large number of research papers in this field contributed both by psychiatrists and psychologists bears witness to the interest in this field, as does also the testimony of Freud, who is reported by Ernest Jones to have given it as his opinion that in due course pharmacological treatment of psychiatric disorders would oust all others.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1957 

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References

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