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Making an impact from the margins? Civil society groups in Zimbabwe's interim power-sharing process

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 November 2016


Michael Aeby
Affiliation:
University of Basel, History Department, Nebenzelg 1, CH-1717 St. Ursen, Switzerland
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The paper examines the role of civil society organisations (CSOs) in Zimbabwe's interim power-sharing process. It identifies CSOs’ organisational capacity, nature of engagement in the political process and relations with the power-sharing parties as the principal issues affecting CSOs’ ability to promote peace-making and democratisation in the context of a transitional executive power-sharing process. Based on these analytical themes, the case analysis argues that CSOs’ sway on the transition was particularly constrained by organisational fragmentation and disunity, divergent strategies vis-à-vis the interregnum, diminishing access to political elites, the latter's refusal to permit greater civic involvement, and continued repression.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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