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Does Perceived Social Support Mediate or Moderate the Relationship Between Victimisation and Suicidal Ideation Among Chinese Adolescents?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2016

Xiaoqun Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Social Medicine and Health Management, XiangYa School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China Department of Women & Children's Health, XiangYa School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China
Gui Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Social Medicine and Health Management, XiangYa School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China
Peng Hu
Affiliation:
School of Education, The Research Central of Psychology and Behavior in Gungzhou, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou, Gungdong, China
Guipin Guo
Affiliation:
Department of Social Medicine and Health Management, XiangYa School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China
Shuiyuan Xiao
Affiliation:
Department of Social Medicine and Health Management, XiangYa School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Bullying is a common problem in school. Engagement in bullying has been known to have many adverse effects, even including suicide. Examining which factor will moderate or mediate the pathway from victimisation to suicidal ideation is needed to develop effective intervention initiatives. This study aimed to examine the mediator and moderator roles of perceived social support in the relationship between victimisation and suicidal ideation. The participants in the study were 946 Chinese adolescents (402 girls, 544 boys) who ranged in age from 11 to 16 years old. The results showed that 48.1% of these adolescents reported being bullied in school. Victimisation was positively correlated with suicidal ideation. There was evidence that perceived social support buffered, as well as partially mediated, the relationship between victimisation and suicidal ideation. Results suggest that helping students to seek more support from their parents and peers may be an effective bullying intervention program.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2016 

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