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Differential Focal and Nonfocal Prospective Memory Accuracy in a Demographically Diverse Group of Nondemented Community-Dwelling Older Adults

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 November 2014

Susan Y. Chi
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Queens College and The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Flushing, New York Department of Psychology, Brooklyn College and The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York
Laura A. Rabin*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Queens College and The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Flushing, New York Department of Psychology, Brooklyn College and The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
Avner Aronov
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Brooklyn College and The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York
Joshua Fogel
Affiliation:
Department of Finance and Business Management, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York
Ashu Kapoor
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Queens College and The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Flushing, New York Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
Cuiling Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
*
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Laura Rabin, Brooklyn College, Department of Psychology, 2900 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11210. E-mail: lrabin@brooklyn.cuny.edu

Abstract

Although prospective memory (PM) is compromised in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), it is unclear which specific cognitive processes underlie these PM difficulties. We investigated older adults’ performance on a computerized event-based focal versus nonfocal PM task that made varying demands on the amount of attentional control required to support intention retrieval. Participants were nondemented individuals (mean age=81.8 years; female=66.1%) enrolled in a community-based longitudinal study, including those with amnestic MCI (aMCI), nonamnestic MCI (naMCI), subjective cognitive decline (SCD), and healthy controls (HC). Participants included in the primary analysis (n=189) completed the PM task and recalled and/or recognized both focal and nonfocal PM cues presented in the task. Participants and their informants also completed a questionnaire assessing everyday PM failures. Relative to HC, those with aMCI and naMCI were significantly impaired in focal PM accuracy (p<.05). In a follow-up analysis that included 13 additional participants who successfully recalled and/or recognized at least one of the two PM cues, the naMCI group showed deficits in nonfocal PM accuracy (p<.05). There was a significant negative correlation between informant reports of PM difficulties and nonfocal PM accuracy (p<.01). PM failures in aMCI may be primarily related to impairment of spontaneous retrieval processes associated with the medial temporal lobe system, while PM failures in naMCI potentially indicate additional deficits in executive control functions and prefrontal systems. The observed focal versus nonfocal PM performance profiles in aMCI and naMCI may constitute specific behavioral markers of PM decline that result from compromise of separate neurocognitive systems. (JINS, 2014, 20, 1–13)

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2014 

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