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Who makes good use of memory aids? Results of a survey of people with acquired brain injury

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 August 2003

Jonathan J. Evans
Affiliation:
The Oliver Zangwill Centre, Princess of Wales Hospital, Ely, UK MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK
Barbara A. Wilson
Affiliation:
The Oliver Zangwill Centre, Princess of Wales Hospital, Ely, UK MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK
Paul Needham
Affiliation:
The Oliver Zangwill Centre, Princess of Wales Hospital, Ely, UK
Sue Brentnall
Affiliation:
The Oliver Zangwill Centre, Princess of Wales Hospital, Ely, UK
Corresponding

Abstract

Wilson and Watson (1996) identified several factors that were associated with use of memory aids and strategies in a group of people with acquired brain injury. The present study tested these findings, with the aim of identifying the variables that best predict effective use of memory aids after brain injury. One-hundred and one people with memory problems arising from brain injury and their carers were interviewed to identify the aids/strategies used to compensate for memory impairment, and the efficacy of their use. Information relating to variables previously found, or hypothesized to predict use of memory aids, was collected. Use of memory aids correlated with level of independence. External aids such as calendars, wall charts, and notebooks were the most commonly used memory aids. Electronic organizers were not used by many participants. The variables that best predicted use of memory aids were (1) current age, (2) time since injury, (3) number of aids used premorbidly, and (4) a measure of attentional functioning. The implications for rehabilitation services are discussed. (JINS, 2003, 9, 925–935.)

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2003

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