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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Clinical and Conceptual Complexities

  • Jennifer J. Vasterling (a1) and Sureyya Dikmen (a2)
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Abstract
Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Jennifer J. Vasterling, Psychology Service and VA National Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare System, (116B), 150 S. Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02130. E-mail: jennifer.vasterling@va.gov, and to Dr. Sureyya Dikmen, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Mail Stop: 359612, Harborview Medical Center, 325 Ninth Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98104. E-mail: Dikmen@u.washington.edu
References
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Bigler E.D. (2008). Neuropsychology and clinical neuroscience of persistent post-concussive syndrome. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 14, 122.
Bryant R.A., Creamer M., O'Donnell M., Silove D., Clark C.R., McFarlane A.C. (2009). Posttraumatic amnesia and the nature of posttraumatic stress disorder after mild traumatic brain injury. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 15, 862867.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Injury prevention and control: Traumatic brain injury. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/statistics.html
Dikmen S., Machamer J., Fann J.R., Temkin N.R. (2010). Rates of symptom reporting following traumatic brain injury. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 16, 401411.
Kessler R.C., Sonnega A., Bromet E., Hughes M., Nelson C.B. (1995). Posttraumatic stress disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey. Archives of General Psychiatry, 52(12), 10481060.
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Luethcke C.A., Bryan C.J., Morrow C.E., Isler W.C. (2011). Comparison of concussive symptoms, cognitive performance, and psychological symptoms between acute blast- versus nonblast-induced mild traumatic brain injury. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 17, 3645.
Marx B.P., Doron-Lamarca S., Proctor S.P., Vasterling J.J. (2009). The influence of pre-deployment neurocognitive functioning on post-deployment PTSD symptom outcomes among Iraq-deployed Army soldiers. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 15, 840852.
Rauch S.L., Shin L.M., Phelps E.A. (2006). Neurocircuitry models of posttraumatic stress disorder and extinction: Human neuroimaging research – Past, present, and future. Biological Psychiatry, 60, 376382.
Tanielian T., Jaycox L.H. (2008). Invisible wounds of war: Psychological and cognitive injuries, their consequences, and services to assist recovery. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation.
Woodward S.H., Kaloupek D.G., Grande L.J., Stegman W.K., Kutter C.J., Leskin L., Eliez S. (2009). Hippocampal volume and declarative memory function in combat-related PTSD. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 15, 830839 .
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Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society
  • ISSN: 1355-6177
  • EISSN: 1469-7661
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-the-international-neuropsychological-society
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