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  • Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, Volume 87, Issue 1
  • February 2007, pp. 293-303

Age and growth of some delphinids in south-eastern Brazil

  • Salvatore Siciliano (a1), Renata Maria A. Ramos (a2), Ana Paula M. Di Beneditto (a3), Marcos César O. Santos (a4), Ana Bernadete Fragoso (a1) (a5), José Lailson Brito (a5) (a6), Alexandre F. Azevedo (a5), André F. C. Vicente (a7), Emerson Zampirolli (a7), Fernando S. Alvarenga (a7), Lupércio Barbosa (a8) and Neuza Rejane W. Lima (a9)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0025315407053398
  • Published online: 26 February 2007
Abstract

This study provides the first compilation on age and growth of some delphinids in south-eastern Brazil (18°25′S–25°45′S). A total of 154 delphinids were reported: 44 Atlantic spotted dolphin Stenella frontalis; 36 bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncatus; 26 ‘Brazilian’ common dolphin Delphinus sp.; 20 rough-toothed dolphin Steno bredanensis; 16 Fraser's dolphin Lagenodelphis hosei; 3 false killer whale Pseudorca crassidens; 3 unidentified Stenella sp.; 2 pantropical spotted dolphin Stenella attenuata; 2 short-finned pilot whale Globicephala macrorhynchus; 1 spinner dolphin Stenella longirostris; and 1 striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba. Age was estimated by counting the number of growth layer groups present in the dentine in 74.5% of the sample. The growth of 92 individuals of the first five species was determined by the Gompertz model to length-at-age data. Stenella frontalis—the oldest specimen was 23 y and the asymptotic length of 224.4 cm predicted by growth curve occurred at about 20 y; T. truncatus—the oldest specimen was 26 y and the asymptotic length of 301.3 cm predicted by growth curve occurred at about 20 y; Delphinus sp.—the oldest dolphin was 18 y and the asymptotic length of 215.9 cm predicted by growth curve occurred at about 5–6 y; S. bredanensis—the oldest specimen was 24 y and the asymptotic length of 258.1 cm predicted by growth curve occurred at about 10 y; L. hosei—the oldest specimen was 19 y and the asymptotic length of 231.2 cm predicted by growth curve occurred at about 7–8 y. Only age was estimated for the other species. The age-at-length data for S. frontalis, Delphinus sp., S. bredanensis and L. hosei were consistent, suggesting a good agreement with previous work on these species. For T. truncatus, the age at asymptotic length obtained in this study might be confirmed by increasing the sample size. The information currently presented will contribute to further life history research of delphinids on the western south Atlantic coast.

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Corresponding author, e-mail: sal@ensp.fiocruz.br
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Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
  • ISSN: 0025-3154
  • EISSN: 1469-7769
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-the-marine-biological-association-of-the-united-kingdom
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