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The First and Second Crusades from an Anonymous Syriac Chronicle

  • A. S. Tritton and H. A. R. Gibb

Extract

In 1443 Zangi advanced with, his army to the neighbourhood of Edessa and besieged a fort to the east of the town which the Franks had surprised from an Arab, Mani' son of ‘utair. Zangi took the fort of Shann, marched close to Edessa, sent an ambassador to the townsmen, and said that he did not wish to fight the Franks but to be at peace with them. They sent him gifts and presents from the town, food and drink, and he passed on to Aleppo.

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References

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page 273 note 1 As-Sinn at junction of Lower Záb with Tigris; in 1129.

page 273 note 2 Blank in MS.

page 273 note 3 a.d. 1132.

page 273 note 4 a.d. 1139.

page 274 note 1 This refers to the siege of Fulk in Ba'rin in a.d. 1137.

page 274 note 2 Zaradna ?

page 274 note 3 a.d. 1135.

page 275 1 c. 1126 according to the Byzantine chroniclers, but see above, p. 100.

page 275 note 2 'ain ud-Dawla b. Ghází, first of the Malaria branch of the Dánishmand family, d. 1151.

page 275 note 3 Arabic , i.e. Lower Cilicia.

page 275 note 4 a.d. 1137.

page 276 note 1 Belonging to the Saljuqid sultan of Konia, Mas'úd (1137).

page 278 note 1 a.d. 1138.

page 278 note 2 i.e. a.d. 1138.

page 280 note 1 a.d. 1143.

page 280 note 2 Michel le Syrien, iii, 261.

page 280 note 3 a.d. 1143. Here the text has an account of the crusade by the emperor of Germany. As it is repeated almost word for word in the proper place it is omitted from the translation here.

page 280 note 4 a.d. 1141–3.

page 282 note 1 Muhammad b. Dubais. Dubais was killed in 1129.

page 282 note 2 a.d. 1124.

page 282 note 3 Same as Básag(?), p. 72. Cf. Michel Le Syrien, iii, 247.

page 282 note 4 Formerly Semkat.

page 282 note 5 The metropolitan.

page 284 note 1 Ten lines describe this man's wickedness, mainly theological.

page 287 note 1 Nasír ud dín.

page 288 note 1 Alp-Arslán b. Mahmúd.

page 289 note 1 Much abridged.

page 290 note 1 The tale of the well is omitted.

page 291 note 1 Nuṣrat ud dín Mírmirán.

page 292 note 1 a.d. 1154.

page 292 note 2 a.d. 1150.

page 298 note 1 a.d. 1148.

page 300 note 1 Murád-Su (Eastern Euphrates).

page 300 note 2 Details omitted in translation.

page 300 note 3 In the marshlands east of the junction of the Qara-Su with the lake of Antioch. The Arabic authors, except Ibn al-Qalánisí, make this battle a victory for Núr ud dín.

page 300 note 4 a.d. 1149.

page 301 note 1 The text has “Shaikh ud-Dair”.

page 301 note 2 Should be Raynald, i.e. Reginald of Chatillon, married in 1153 Constance, daughter of Bohemund II and widow of Raymond of Poitou.

page 302 note 1 a.d. 1157.

page 302 note 2 Behesná.

page 302 note 3 a.d. 1159.

page 302 note 4 a.d. 1157.

page 302 note 5 a.d. 1158.

page 303 note 1 a.d. 1159.

page 303 note 2 a.d. 1160.

page 303 note 3 Bohemund III, son of Raymond of Poitou.

page 303 note 4 Perhaps Raynald, from the Armenian form Renaghd. (Michel le Syrien, iii, 288.)

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