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Cosmopolitanism for Earth Dwellers: Kant on the Right to be Somewhere

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2017

Jakob Huber*
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science

Abstract

The paper provides a systematic account of Kant’s ‘right to be somewhere’ as introduced in the Doctrine of Right. My claim is that Kant’s concern with the concurrent existence of a plurality of corporeal agents on the earth’s surface (to which the right speaks) occupies a rarely appreciated conceptual space in his mature political philosophy. In grounding a particular kind of moral relation that is ‘external’ (as located in bounded space) but not property-mediated, it provides us with a fundamentally new perspective on Kant’s cosmopolitanism, which I construe as a cosmopolitanism for ‘earth dwellers’.

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Articles
Copyright
© Kantian Review 2017 

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