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Geographically disjunct phylogenetic lineages in Leptogium hibernicum reveal Leptogium krogiae sp. nov. from East Africa

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 May 2017

Torbjørg BJELLAND
Affiliation:
Rådgivende Biologer AS, Bredsgården, Bryggen, N-5003 Bergen, Norway
Mika BENDIKSBY*
Affiliation:
NTNU University Museum, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway
Andreas FRISCH
Affiliation:
NTNU University Museum, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway

Abstract

Phylogenetic analyses of nuclear (Mcm7, nrITS, nrLSU) and mitochondrial (mrSSU) DNA sequences revealed geographically disjunct lineages in Leptogium hibernicum. One of these lineages is described here as Leptogium krogiae, which differs from L. hibernicum in the thinner thallus (190–210 µm vs. 390–480 µm), shallowly striate lobes instead of deeply furrowed lobes, isidia that are seldom distinctly flattened, and apothecia with a subhymenial euparaplectenchymatous layer. Leptogium krogiae is a widespread epiphyte in mist-affected woodlands and montane forests in East Africa and appears to be a common species.

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Articles
Copyright
© British Lichen Society, 2017 

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Geographically disjunct phylogenetic lineages in Leptogium hibernicum reveal Leptogium krogiae sp. nov. from East Africa
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