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First record of the mandarin dogfish Cirrhigaleus barbifer (Chondrichthyes: Squalidae) from Western Australia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2013

Ryan M. Kempster*
Affiliation:
The UWA Oceans Institute and the School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia
David M. Hunt
Affiliation:
The UWA Oceans Institute and the School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia
Brett A. Human
Affiliation:
The Western Australian Museum, Welshpool, Western Australia 6986, Australia
Channing A. Egeberg
Affiliation:
The UWA Oceans Institute and the School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia
Shaun P. Collin
Affiliation:
The UWA Oceans Institute and the School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: R.M. Kempster, The UWA Oceans Institute and the School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia email: ryankempster@supportoursharks.com
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Abstract

The mandarin dogfish, Cirrhigaleus barbifer, is the only species in this genus found in Western Australia, and represents a significant range extension and first record in Australia. Most Cirrhigaleus sharks are clearly separable from other squalid sharks by the presence of conspicuous barbels on the anterior nasal flaps. Cirrhigaleus barbifer may be distinguished from its close relative C. australis by the structure of the CO1 gene and key measurements. In addition, this is only the second record of a gravid female of C. barbifer, with pups in an advanced stage of development. New data on the reproductive biology and range of C. barbifer are included.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2013

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References

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First record of the mandarin dogfish Cirrhigaleus barbifer (Chondrichthyes: Squalidae) from Western Australia
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First record of the mandarin dogfish Cirrhigaleus barbifer (Chondrichthyes: Squalidae) from Western Australia
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