Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-6g96d Total loading time: 0.395 Render date: 2022-07-01T15:11:38.905Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

First records of golden trevally (Gnathodon speciosus, Carangidae), sharp-tail mola (Masturus lanceolatus, Molidae) and evidence for white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, Lamnidae) in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 October 2010

V.L.G. Todd*
Affiliation:
Ocean Science Consulting Ltd, Ocean House, 4 Brewery Lane, Belhaven, Dunbar, East Lothian, EH42 1PD, Scotland, UK Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, University Road, Southampton, S017 1BJ, UK
J.S. Grove*
Affiliation:
Section of Fishes, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 900 Exposition Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90007, USA Zegrahm Expeditions, 192 Nickerson St #200 Seattle, WA 98109, USA
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: V.L.G. Todd, Ocean Science Consulting Ltd, Ocean House, 4 Brewery Lane, Belhaven, Dunbar, East Lothian, EH42 1PD, Scotland, UK email: v.todd@oceanscienceconsulting.com
J.S. Grove, Section of Fishes, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 900 Exposition Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90007, USA email: JSGImages@aol.com
Get access

Abstract

In 1995, a complete survey of the fish collection in the Charles Darwin Research Station (CDRS) Museum (Galápagos Islands, Ecuador) was undertaken. Five specimens represented possible new records to the archipelago, but insufficient material was available at CDRS to confirm identification. On 5 November 2007, the specimens were removed from the CDRS fish collection under licence from the Parque Nacional Galápagos (PNG) on loan to the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History (LACM). Identification of all species was confirmed using comparative LACM voucher specimens, including X-rays, scientific keys and other resources, which were, at the time, unavailable to scientists at the CDRS. Four of the five specimens were incorrectly identified in 1995, the fifth, the golden trevally, Gnathodon speciosus, is the first confirmed record of this species for the Galápagos. One of the originally mis-identified specimens, the longnose anchovy (Anchoa nasus), proved to be A. ischana (sharpnose anchovy), and A. nasus can now be eliminated as a verified record from the islands. The first confirmed record of the sharp-tail mola, Masturus lanceolatus, for the archipelago is also presented based on photographic and video evidence. The first physical evidence of the white shark, Carcharodon carcharias, in the Galápagos Archipelago based on discovery of a tooth and C14 analysis, is presented.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Allen, G.R. (2008) Conservation hotspots of biodiversity and endemism for Indo-Pacific coral reef fishes. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems 18, 541556.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Allen, G.R. and Robertson, D.R. (1994) The complete divers' and fishermen's guide to fishes of the tropical eastern Pacific. Bathurst, Australia and Honolulu, Hawaii: Crawford House Press Pty Ltd and University of Hawaii Press.Google Scholar
Anderson, W.D. and Baldwin, C.C. (2000) A new species of Anthias (Teleostei: Serranidae: Anthiinae) from the Galápagos Islands, with keys to Anthias and eastern Pacific Anthiinae. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 113, 369385.Google Scholar
Baldwin, C.C. and McCosker, J.E. (2001) Wrasses of the Galápagos Islands, with the description of a new deepwater species of Halichoeres (Perciformes: Labridae). Revista de Biología Tropical 49, 89100.Google Scholar
Bearez, P. and Prado, P.J. (2003) New records of serranids (Perciformes) from the continental shelf of Ecuador with a key to the species, and comments on ENSO-associated fish dispersal. Cybium 27, 107115.Google Scholar
Bortone, S.A. (1977) Revision of the sea basses of the genus Diplectrum (Pisces: Serranidae). NOAA Technical Report, Circular no. 404, pp. 149. [National Marine Fisheries Services.]Google Scholar
Bussing, W.A. and Lavenberg, R.J. (1995) Synodontidae. Lagartos. In Fischer, W., Krupp, F., Schneider, C., Sommer, K., Carpenter, E. and Niem, V.H. (eds) Guía FAO para la identificación de especies para los fines de la pesca. Pacifico Centro-Oriental, Volume 3. Rome: FAO, pp. 16251628.Google Scholar
Calvopiña, M. and Edgar, G. (2009) Threatened marine species eastern tropical Pacific region—guide and logbook. The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, p. 48.Google Scholar
Chavez, F.P. and Brusca, R.C. (1991) The Galapagos Islands and their relation to oceanographic processes in the tropical Pacific. In James, M.J. (ed.) Galápagos marine invertebrates. New York: Plenum, pp. 933.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cheung, W.W.L., Pitcher, T.J. and Pauly, D. (2005) A fuzzy logic expert system to estimate intrinsic extinction vulnerabilities of marine fishes to fishing. Biological Conservation 124, 97111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cohen, D.M. and McCosker, J.E. (1998) A new species of bythitid fish, genus Lucifuga, from the Galápagos Islands. Bulletin of Marine Science 63, 179187.Google Scholar
Danulat, E. and Edgar, G.J. (2002) Reserva marina de Galápagos: Línea base de la biodiversidad. Puerto Ayora: Charles Darwin Foundation and Galápagos National Park Service.Google Scholar
Edgar, G.J., Bustamante, R.H., Farina, J.M., Calvopina, M., Martinez, C. and Toral-Granda, M.V. (2004) Bias in evaluating the effects of marine protected areas: the importance of baseline data for the Galapagos Marine Reserve. Environmental Conservation 31, 212218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eschmeyer, W.N. (ed.) (1998) Catalogue of fishes. San Francisco: California Academy of Sciences.Google Scholar
Figueiredo, J.L. and Menezes, N.A. (2000) Manual de peixes marinhos do sudeste do Brasil. São Paulo: Museu de Zoologia, Universidade de São Paulo, Brasil.Google Scholar
Fischer, W., Krupp, F., Schneider, C., Sommer, K., Carpenter, E. and Niem, V.H. (eds) (1995) Guía FAO para la identificación para los fines de la pesca. Pacifico centro-oriental. Vertebrados—part 1, Volume 3. Rome: FAO, pp. 6471200.Google Scholar
Goodson, G. (1988) Fishes of the Pacific coast. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Grove, J.S. and Lavenberg, R.J. (1997) The fishes of the Galápagos Islands. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Grove, J.S., Massay, S. and Garcia, S. (1984) Péces de las Galápagos Ecuador. Boletín Cientifico y Técnico. Institúto Nacionál de Pésca, Guyaquil, Ecuador 7, 1157.Google Scholar
Harbison, G.R. and Janssen, J. (1987) Encounters with a swordfish (Xiphias gladius) and a sharptail mola (Masturus lanceolatus) at depths greater than 600 meters. Copeia 1987, 511513.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hastings, P.A. (2000) Biogeography of the Tropical Eastern Pacific: distribution and phylogeny of chaenopsid fishes. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 128, 319335.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Humann, P. (1993) Reef fish identification: Galápagos. Jacksonville, FL: New World Publications.Google Scholar
IUCN (2009) The International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN Red List of threatened species). www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded April 2009.Google Scholar
Jonklaas, R. (1975) Collecting marine tropicals. Neptune City, NJ: T.F.H. Publications.Google Scholar
Jordan, D.S. and Evermann, B.W. (1896) The fishes of north and middle America. A descriptive catalogue of the species of fish-like vertebrates found in the waters of North America, north of the isthmus of Panama. Bulletin of the United States National Museum 47, 11240.Google Scholar
Krupp, F. (1995) Achiridae. Suelas. In Fischer, W., Krupp, F., Schneider, C., Sommer, K., Carpenter, E. and Niem, V.H. (eds) Guía FAO para la identificación para los fines de la pesca. Pacifico centro-oriental, Volume 3. Rome: FAO, pp. 845850.Google Scholar
Lieske, E. and Myers, R. (1996) Coral reef fishes Indo-Pacific and Caribbean. London: Harper Collins Publishers.Google Scholar
Matsuura, K. (2002) Molidae. Molas (ocean sunfishes, headfishes). In Carpenter, K.E. (ed.) FAO species identification guide for fishery purposes. The living marine resources of the western central Atlantic. Bony fishes, part 2 (Opistognathidae to Molidae), sea turtles and marine mammals, Volume 3. Tokyo: FAO, pp. 20142015.Google Scholar
McCosker, J.E. (1998) Review of the fishes of the Galápagos Islands by J.S. Grove and R.J. Lavenberg, 1997. Copeia 1998, 809812.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCosker, J.E. and Rosenblatt, R.H. (1984) The inshore fish fauna of the Galápagos Islands. In Perry, R. (ed.) Key environments Galápagos. Oxford: Pergamon Press, pp. 133144.Google Scholar
Meek, S.E. and Hildebrand, S.F. (1923) The marine fishes of Panamá. Part 1. Field Museum of Natural History 15, 1330.Google Scholar
Merlen, G. (1988) A field guide to the fishes of Galapagos. London: Wilmot Books.Google Scholar
Merlen, G. (1995) A field guide to the marine mammals of the Galapagos. Guayaquil: Instituto Nacional de Pesca, pp. 130.Google Scholar
Nelson, J.S. (1994) Fishes of the world. New York: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
Palacios, D.M. (2003) Oceanographic conditions around the Galápagos Archipelago and their influence on cetacean community structure. PhD thesis. Oregon State University, Corvallis, USA.Google Scholar
Pequeño, G. (1989) Peces de Chile. Lista sistemática revisada y comentada. Revista de Biología Marina, Valparaíso 24, 1132.Google Scholar
Peterson, C.L. (1956) Observations on the taxonomy, biology, and ecology of the engraulid and clupeid fishes in the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica. Bulletin of the International Tropical Tuna Commission 9, 139211.Google Scholar
Randall, J.E. (1973) Size of great white shark (Carcharodon). Science 181, 169170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reck, G.K. (1983) The coastal fisheries in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador: description and consequences for management in the context of marine environmental protection and regional development. PhD thesis. University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.Google Scholar
Robertson, D.R. and Allen, G.R. (2008) Shorefishes of the Tropical Eastern Pacific online information system. Version 1.0 (2008). Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Balboa, Panamá. www.neotropicalfishes.org/sftep, www.stri.org/sftep. Downloaded April 2009.Google Scholar
Robertson, D.R. and Cramer, K.L. (2009) Shore fishes and biogeographic subdivisions of the Tropical Eastern Pacific. Marine Ecology Progress Series 380, 117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Robertson, D.R., Grove, J.S. and McCosker, J.E. (2004) Tropical transpacific shore fishes. Pacific Science 58, 507565.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Seitz, A.C., Weng, K.C., Boustany, A.M. and Block, B.A. (2002) Behaviour of a sharptail mola in the Gulf of Mexico. Journal of Fish Biology 60, 15971602.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thresher, R.E. and Colin, P.L. (1986) Trophic structure, diversity and abundance of fishes of the deep reef (30–300 m) at Enewetak, Marshall Islands. Bulletin of Marine Science 38, 253272.Google Scholar
Victor, B.C., Wellington, G.M., Robertson, D.R. and Ruttenberg, B.I. (2001) The effect of the El Niño Southern Oscillation event on the distribution of reef-associated labrid fishes in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Bulletin of Marine Science 69, 279288.Google Scholar
Walker, H.J. and Bollinger, J. (2001) A new species of Trinectes (Pleuronectiformes: Achiridae), with comments on the other Eastern Pacific species of the genus Revista de Biología Tropical 49, Supplement 1, 177186.Google Scholar
Whitehead, P.J.P., Nelson, G.J. and Wongratana, T. (1988) FAO Species Catalogue. Volume 7. Clupeoid fishes of the world (suborder: Clupeoidei). An annotated and illustrated catalogue of the herrings, sardines, pilchards, sprats, shads, anchovies and wolf-herrings. Part 2. Engraulidae. FAO Fisheries Synopsis 125, Volume 7, pt. 2, pp. 305579.Google Scholar
2
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

First records of golden trevally (Gnathodon speciosus, Carangidae), sharp-tail mola (Masturus lanceolatus, Molidae) and evidence for white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, Lamnidae) in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

First records of golden trevally (Gnathodon speciosus, Carangidae), sharp-tail mola (Masturus lanceolatus, Molidae) and evidence for white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, Lamnidae) in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

First records of golden trevally (Gnathodon speciosus, Carangidae), sharp-tail mola (Masturus lanceolatus, Molidae) and evidence for white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, Lamnidae) in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *