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Occurrence of the non-indigenous Omobranchus punctatus (Blenniidae) on the São Paulo coast, South-Eastern Brazil

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 May 2015

R.F. Contente*
Affiliation:
Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo (IOUSP), Praça do Oceanográfico 191, 05508–120, São Paulo, Brazil
M.R. Brenha-Nunes
Affiliation:
Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo (IOUSP), Praça do Oceanográfico 191, 05508–120, São Paulo, Brazil
C.C. Siliprandi
Affiliation:
Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo (IOUSP), Praça do Oceanográfico 191, 05508–120, São Paulo, Brazil
R.A. Lamas
Affiliation:
Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo (IOUSP), Praça do Oceanográfico 191, 05508–120, São Paulo, Brazil
V.R.M. Conversani
Affiliation:
Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo (IOUSP), Praça do Oceanográfico 191, 05508–120, São Paulo, Brazil
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: R.F. Contente, Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo, Praça do Oceanográfico, 191, Office 103A, 05508-120, São Paulo, Brazil Email: riguel@usp.br
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Abstract

We report, for the first time, the occurrence of the muzzled blenny, Omobranchus punctatus, on the coast of São Paulo, South-Eastern Brazil, partially filling a record gap within the species’ expected distribution in Brazil. One individual was found on 16 June 2014 in a sand-bottom tide pool of a tidal flat ecosystem, adjacent to the port of São Sebastião.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2015 

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Occurrence of the non-indigenous Omobranchus punctatus (Blenniidae) on the São Paulo coast, South-Eastern Brazil
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