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Microscopic study of bacteria-textile material interaction for hygienic purpose

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 August 2009

J. M. M. Malheiro
Affiliation:
Textile and Paper Materials Research Unit, University of Beira Interior, Av. Marquês Ávila Bolama, 6201-001 Covilhã, Portugal
L. R. S. Salvado
Affiliation:
Textile and Paper Materials Research Unit, University of Beira Interior, Av. Marquês Ávila Bolama, 6201-001 Covilhã, Portugal

Abstract

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Underwear is the most intimate form of dress, and feminine panties are particularly in close contact with genital mucosa, vulvar skin and perineum area. In fact, despite some controversy, the textile material has been pointed out as promoter of vaginal infection, trough changes on the normal skin physiology. The physiology of vulvar skin is very specific in terms of temperature (≈ 34°C), moisture and pH (< 4.7). This region is also colonized by a very specific microflora that is essential either to protect against pathogenic microorganisms, either to maintain healthy conditions of temperature, moisture and pH.

Type
Materials Sciences
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2009