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Guidelines for Understanding Magnification in the Modern Digital Microscope Era

  • James A. DeRose (a1) and Michael Doppler (a1)
Abstract:

For digital light microscopes, which have image sensors but no eyepieces, the image is displayed directly on an electronic monitor. This development brings a significant change to the usual way magnification of an object viewed via a microscope is determined. Over the years, there have been various standards that define magnification when viewing an image through a microscope’s eyepieces. Only recently have magnification standards been developed that apply to a digital microscope. This article offers guidelines for determining the range of useful magnification values for digital microscopy, particularly when monitors of various sizes are employed.

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References
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Microscopy Today
  • ISSN: 1551-9295
  • EISSN: 2150-3583
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