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How researchers can help K–12 teachers bring materials science into the classroom

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 April 2011

Julie A. Nucci
Affiliation:
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA; jn28@cornell.edu
Paul Doherty
Affiliation:
Exploratorium Teacher Institute, San Francisco, CA, USA; dohertypm@gmail.com
Linda Lung
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO, USA; linda.lung@nrel.gov
Nev Singhota
Affiliation:
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA; nks5@cornell.edu
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Abstract

Education research strongly indicates that students make decisions in their mid- to late adolescence that impact the general direction of their careers, including choices about pursuing studies in science and mathematics. Educators can play an important role in these student career choices. By creating and implementing teacher professional development programs that increase teachers’ awareness/understanding of materials science and providing materials science-based classroom materials, researchers can take concrete actions toward improving the number and quality of students entering materials science and engineering departments as undergraduate students. No matter where you live or work throughout the world, there is a school nearby and abundant opportunities for researchers to make a difference in K–12 science education.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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